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Student Handbook


565 West Adams Street
Chicago, Illinois 60661
(312) 906-5000

Compiled by
Stephen D. Sowle
Assistant Dean for Academic Administration
and Student Affairs

(312) 906-5130
 
 
RIGHTS RESERVED

Chicago-Kent College of Law reserves the right, without notice, to change the requirements for admission or graduation; the arrangement, time, credit, or content of courses; the books to be used; the tuition or other fees charged; academic standards; the regulations affecting students; and any and all other matters contained in this Handbook. Changes will be duly published.


LAW SCHOOL POLICIES ON EQUALITY OF OPPORTUNITY

Chicago-Kent College of Law provides equality of opportunity in legal education for all persons, including faculty and employees, with respect to hiring, continuation, promotion and tenure, applicants for admission, enrolled students, and alumni, without discrimination on the ground of race, color, religion, national origin, gender, age, disability, sexual orientation, or gender identity. (See §16.1 of this Handbook.)

In addition, Chicago-Kent College of Law provides its students, alumni, faculty members, law school administrators, and other authorized users of its placement facilities with equal opportunity to obtain employment without discrimination or segregation on the ground of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, age, handicap or disability, sexual orientation, or gender identity. Placement facilities and services of Chicago-Kent are available only to employers whose employment practices are consistent with this policy and are similarly non-discriminatory. (See §18.5 of this Handbook.)

 

CONTENTS

Academic Calendar

Directory

Where to Go, Whom to Ask

Student Organizations

SECTION I. REQUIREMENTS FOR THE J.D. DEGREE

1.1 Credit Hours, Time to Complete the Degree, and Grade Point Average Requirements
1.2Required Courses
1.3Independent Research in Lieu of a Seminar
1.4Legal Writing 4 Waiver
1.5Semesters in Residence
1.6Studying at Another Law School
1.7Application for Graduation
1.8Student Responsibility for Fulfilling Requirements
1.9Bar Examination Requirements
1.10 Degree with Honors
1.11The Order of the Coif
1.12Law Review Eligibility
1.13Moot Court Honor Society Eligibility
1.14Intellectual Property Moot Court Eligibility
1.15Credit for Moot Court Participation
1.16 Certificate in Environmental and Energy Law
1.17Certificate in International and Comparative Law
1.18Certificate in Intellectual Property Law
1.19Certificate in Labor and Employment Law
1.20Certificate in Litigation and Alternative Dispute Resolution (LADR)
1.21Joint J.D./LL.M. in Taxation
1.22Joint J.D./LL.M. in Financial Services Law
1.23Joint J.D./M.B.A. (Masters in Business Administration)
1.24Joint J.D./M.S. in Financial Markets
1.25Joint J.D./M.S. in Environmental Management
1.26Joint J.D./M.P.A. (Masters in Public Administration)
1.27London Law Consortium

SECTION II. STUDY LOAD, COURSE, AND WORK LIMITATIONS

2.1Maximum Credit Hours
2.2Minimum Credit Hours
2.3Seminar Limitation
2.4Pass/Fail Election
2.5Law Review and Moot Court Credit Hour Limitation
2.6Clinical Course 16 Credit Hour and Externship Limitations
2.7Non-Classroom Course and Pass/Fail 19 Credit Hour Limitation
2.8Employment Limitation for Full-Time Day Division Students
2.9Exceptions to Limitations
2.10Hour Requirements for Financial Aid and Loan Deferment Purposes
2.11Legal Writing and Academic Support Program Teaching Assistant Limitations

SECTION III. REGISTRATION PROCEDURES

3.1Official Registration Required
3.2Registration Priority
3.3Sequence of Required Courses
3.4Registration for In-House Clinical Programs
3.5Registration for Externships
3.6Registration for LL.M. courses
3.7Registration for Independent Research
3.8Registration for Intensive Trial Advocacy
3.9Registration for Courses in Another Division
3.10Adding and Dropping Courses
3.11Changing Divisions
3.12Class Attendance in Proper Section
3.13Auditing Classes

SECTION IV. WITHDRAWAL AND REENTRY TO THE LAW SCHOOL

4.1Withdrawal or Transferring From the Law School
4.2Reentry Before Completion of One Semester
4.3Reentry After Completion of One Semester, But Before One Year
4.4Reentry After Completion of at Least One Year

SECTION V. TRANSFER CREDITS FROM OTHER SCHOOLS

5.1Procedure for Taking Courses at Another Law School
5.2Courses at Other Chicago-Area Law Schools
5.3Credit Hour Limitations for Courses Taken at Other Law Schools
5.4Credit Hours Required for a Chicago-Kent Degree
5.5Procedure to Take Non-Law Courses at Graduate Schools

SECTION VI. GRADING SYSTEM

6.1Grading Scale
6.2Computation of Grade Point Average
6.3Grade of WP (Withdrew Passing)
6.4Grade of WE (Withdrew Failing)
6.5Grade of I (Incomplete)
6.6Grades of P (Pass) and LP (Low Pass)
6.7Effect of Grades of P (Pass), LP (Low Pass), E (Failure), and WP (Withdrew Failing) on GPA
6.8Grading Curves
6.9Anonymous Grading
6.10Change of Grade
6.11Deadline for Submission of Grades
6.12Disclosure of Grades
6.13Class Rank
6.14Dean's Honor List
6.15Transcripts
6.16CALI Excellence for the Future Award

SECTION VII. EXAMINATIONS

7.1In General
7.2Exam Schedule and Conflicts
7.3Missing an Examination
7.4Make-up Examinations
7.5Student Conduct During Examinations
7.6Examination Procedures
7.7Determination of Grades
7.8Review of Examinations and Other Assignments
7.9Appeal of Grade

SECTION VIII. GRADE POINT AVERAGE REQUIREMENTS

8.1Definitions
8.2[Reserved]
8.3GPA Requirements
8.4Dismissal From the Law School
8.5Academic Probation
8.6Effect of Summer Session Grades on the Probationary Semester
8.7Applications for Readmission
8.8Repeated Courses

SECTION IX. CLASS ATTENDANCE

9.1Class Attendance
9.2Failure of an Instructor to Appear in Class
9.3Tape Recording Class Sessions
9.4Scheduling of Make-up Classes

SECTION X. FACULTY MEETINGS AND COMMITTEES

10.1Schedule of Faculty Meetings
10.2Student Representation
10.3Publication of Minutes of Faculty Meetings
10.4Student Representation on Faculty Committees
10.5Dean's Advisory Council

SECTION XI. CURRICULAR MATTERS

11.1Required Courses and Course Descriptions
11.2Recommended Courses for Upper-Level Students
11.3Course Prerequisites

SECTION XII. TUITION AND FEES

12.1Tuition
12.2U-Pass Fee
12.3Student Activities Fee
12.4Student Insurance
12.5Change of Program
12.6Course Materials
12.7Payment of Charges
12.8Financial Delinquency
12.9Dishonored Checks
12.10Tuition Refund Policy
12.11Tuition Refund Policy: Special Situations

SECTION XIII. FINANCIAL AID AND SCHOLARSHIPS

13.1Full-time, Half-time Status for Financial Aid & Deferment Purposes
13.2Scholarships
13.3Scholarship Policies
13.4Outside Scholarships
13.5Student Loans
13.6Sandra Baez Emergency Loan Fund
13.7Summer Loans
13.8Visiting Another Law School or Visiting Overseas
13.9Veterans
13.10Deferments

SECTION XIV. GENERAL INFORMATION

14.1Official Notices: Law School Record
14.2Bulletin Boards and Posting of Notices
14.3Rule 711 Licenses
14.4Privacy Rights and Access to Educational Records
14.5Directory Information
14.6Reservation of Rooms and Scheduling of Events
14.7Use of Facilities
14.8Lost and Found
14.9Lockers
14.10Bookstore
14.11ID Cards
14.12Parking
14.13IIT Main Campus Facilities
14.14Shuttle Bus Service to Main Campus
14.15Personal Mail
14.16School Closing Due to Inclement Weather
14.17Alcoholic Beverages
14.18Smoking Policy
14.19Student Complaints
14.20Escort Service
14.21 Building and Library Hours

SECTION XV. [Reserved]

SECTION XVI. ANTI-DISCRIMINATION AND HARASSMENT POLICIES

16.1Law School Policy on Equality of Opportunity
16.2IIT Policy on Equality of Opportunity
16.3IIT Policy on Sexual Harassment

SECTION XVII. DOWNTOWN CAMPUS LIBRARY

17.1Library Hours
17.2General Rules
17.3Circulation Policies
17.4Fine Schedule for Overdue Books

SECTION XVIII. CAREER SERVICES

18.1Use of Services
18.2Office Rules
18.3Candidate Principles and Standards for Law Placement and Recruiting
18.4Employer Compliance with Non-Discrimination Policies
18.5Non-Discrimination Policy and Discrimination Complaint Procedures

SECTION XIX. CODE OF CONDUCT

Art. IDefinitions
Art. IIProhibited Conduct
Art. IIILaw School Discipline Tribunal
Art. IVGuilty Plea
Art. VPrehearing Procedures
Art. VIHearing Procedures
Art. VIIAppeal
Art. VIIIMaintenance of Records
Art. IXExclusivity of This Code
Art. XEffective Date; Repeal; Savings; Amendments

SECTION XX. DRUG AND ALCOHOL ABUSE PREVENTION


SECTION I. REQUIREMENTS FOR THE JURIS DOCTOR DEGREE

§ 1.1     Credit Hours, Time to Complete the Degree, and Grade Point Average Requirements

Students must complete 87 hours of credit to earn the degree of Juris Doctor. Students must complete the Juris Doctor degree no later than 84 months after commencing law studies at Chicago-Kent or at a law school from which Chicago-Kent has accepted transfer credit. All students must attain a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.300 to earn the degree.

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§ 1.2     Required Courses

The following courses must be successfully completed to earn the J.D. degree: Contracts, Torts, Criminal Law, Civil Procedure, Property, Legislation, Legal Writing 1, Legal Writing 2, Legal Writing 3, Legal Writing 4, Constitutional Law, Professional Responsibility, and one seminar. To satisfy the degree requirement, the seminar must be taken in a semester at the start of which the student has successfully completed at least 54 hours of credit and has completed the Legal Writing 4 writing requirement, unless the Assistant Dean for Academic Administration and Student Affairs waives this requirement in the same manner as provided in §2.9. Students may take seminars for which they meet the prerequisites in earlier semesters, but not in satisfaction of the degree requirement. Certain writing requirements may be waived or satisfied in an alternative manner as provided in §§1.3, 1.4, and 1.20.

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§ 1.3     Independent Research in Lieu of a Seminar

The seminar requirement may be satisfied by an Independent Research course supervised by a member of the full-time faculty. To fulfill the seminar requirement, an extensive seminar-style research paper must be written. A student must obtain written approval from the instructor and the Assistant Dean for Academic Administration and Student Affairs prior to beginning the research and prior to registration. In order to satisfy the seminar requirement, Independent Research must be taken in a semester at the start of which the student has completed at least 54 hours of credit and has completed Legal Writing 4, unless the Assistant Dean waives this requirement in the same manner as provided in §2.9. Independent Research is graded on a pass/fail basis; a student may not earn a letter grade. Only one credit hour is awarded for this course even though it fulfills the two-credit hour seminar requirement. A student may earn only one credit hour of Independent Research per semester.

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§ 1.4     Legal Writing 4 Waiver

The Legal Writing 4 requirement may be waived by taking a Legal Writing 4 Equivalency Class in certain circumstances for students who participate in one of the following: Law Review, Moot Court Honor Society, the Litigation and Alternative Dispute Resolution Program, the Criminal Litigation Program, and Judicial Externship. For details, see the most recent semester's Schedule of Classes or Registration Bulletin, or contact the Assistant Dean for Academic Administration and Student Affairs.

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§ 1.5     Semesters in Residence

(a) General Information

The number of hours required to meet the residency requirement is unrelated to the definition of full-time, half-time or part-time for financial aid and scholarship purposes. See §13.1 for those requirements.

Students who change from one division to the other, or from part-time to full-time Day Division status, should contact the Assistant Dean for Academic Administration and Student Affairs regarding their residency requirement.

(b) Full-Time Students

Full-time Day Division students must spend at least six semesters "in residence" at Chicago-Kent or other ABA-approved law school. A full-time Day Division semester "in residence" is a semester with at least 12 credit hours. However, a semester "in residence" for a full-time Day Division senior student is a semester with at least 10 credit hours; this applies to the last two semesters before a student graduates. If a full-time Day Division student attends two Summer sessions the number of semesters required "in residence" may be reduced by one, provided that the student takes at least ten hours during the Summer sessions.

(c) Part-Time Students

Part-time Day Division students and Evening Division students must spend at least eight semesters "in residence" at the Chicago-Kent or other ABA-approved law school. A semester "in residence" for these students is a semester with at least eight credit hours. If a part-time Day Division student or an Evening Division student attends two or three Summer sessions, the number of semesters required "in residence" may be reduced by one, provided the student takes at least eight hours during the Summer sessions.

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§ 1.6     Studying at Another Law School

If a student receives permission to study at another law school, the student will receive a degree from Chicago-Kent provided the student earns at least 54 credit hours at Chicago-Kent and meets the other degree requirements of the Law School. In appropriate circumstances, the  Assistant Dean for Academic Administration and Student Affairs may make modifications to the credit hour requirement. See §5.1 for the procedures for obtaining permission to study at another law school.

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§ 1.7     Application for Graduation

Graduating seniors must submit an Application for Graduation to the Registrar's office as soon as their class schedule for their final term is confirmed. It is imperative for graduating seniors to notify the Registrar if they have changed their schedules and reduced their hours after they have submitted the Application for Graduation.

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§ 1.8     Student Responsibility for Fulfilling Requirements

Each student has the responsibility to make sure that all degree requirements are fulfilled. Graduating seniors should make an independent review of their records before registering for their final semester. The Registrar will review the academic record of each senior who has submitted an Application for Graduation and will attempt to notify a student of any apparent deficiencies prior to the conclusion of the add/drop period for the student's last semester. However, it is the student's responsibility, not the Registrar's, to make sure that all degree requirements will be fulfilled by the end of the final semester. After all graduating seniors' grades have been received by the Registrar in the final semester, the Registrar will review each graduating senior's record to make sure that all degree requirements are fulfilled. If a student has not fulfilled all degree requirements, he or she will not receive a degree and will not be certified to the bar examiners.

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§ 1.9      Bar Examination Requirements

(a) General Information

Students who plan to take the Illinois bar exam after graduation should register with the Illinois Board of Admissions to the Bar by March 1 of their first year of law school. Students who register after that date are required to pay a substantial late fee. The Illinois bar exam is administered in February and July of each year. Students must also pass the Multistate Professional Responsibility Exam (MPRE), which is given four times a year and may be taken after you have earned two-thirds of the academic credits required for the Juris Doctor (at Chicago-Kent, this means you must have completed 58 credits). The registration forms and instructions for the Illinois bar exam are available on the web at http://www.ibaby.org. Information about the MPRE is available in the Registrar's office or on the web at http://www.ncbex.org/multistate-tests/mpre/.

Illinois does not require any specified courses to take the bar exam. However, some states require specific law courses to be eligible to take the bar exam. Students should obtain information as soon after they begin law school as possible about the character and fitness, curricular, preregistration, and other requirements for admission to the bar in states in which they may seek admission. This information is available in the  office of the  Assistant Dean for Academic Administration and Student Affairs and in the Registrar's office. Graduating seniors must advise the Registrar of the forms and documents required by out-of-state bar examiners well in advance of the date the material is required.

(b) Character and Fitness

At the end of each semester, the Law School sends a Certificate of Dean of Law School to the Illinois Board of Admissions to the Bar for each graduate certifying that the student has earned the J.D. degree. The Certificate requires the dean to answer the following questions for the Character and Fitness Committee and to provide relevant details and documentation:

1. Do your records or other information show anything adverse as to his/her honesty, integrity or general conduct?

2. Was he/she ever involved in a disciplinary inquiry or proceeding while in attendance?

3. Are you aware of any matter or matters reflecting adversely upon his/her reputation and character?

4. Remarks: Here please state any facts, not covered by the foregoing questions, unfavorable to the applicant which you think the committee should know in connection with its duty to determine whether he/she is worthy of the highest trust and confidence.

Other states require similar certificates to be completed by the Law School for students taking the bar exam in their states.

All information disclosed on the bar registration application should be consistent with answers to questions on the student's Application for Admission to the Law School. The bar registration application, however, asks for a considerable amount of information that applicants are not asked to provide on the Application for Admission. You only need to be concerned about the consistency of answers for questions asked on both forms. You can amend your Application for Admission, if necessary, by addressing a letter to the Assistant Dean for Academic Administration and Student Affairs setting forth the details of the omission or misrepresentation and the reason for it.

(c) Graduating Seniors

Graduating seniors must file a Bar Exam Application by February 1 of their senior year if they plan on taking the July bar exam. (Students planning on taking the February bar exam should check the deadlines and other requirements on the bar examiners' web site.) This applies to all graduating students, whether or not they registered with the bar examiners as a first-year student. Late applications for the July bar exam may be filed up to May 31, but penalty fees apply. The forms and instructions are available on the bar examiners' web site at http://www.ibaby.org. The Law School sends a Certificate of Dean of Law School/Proof of Legal Education to the Illinois bar examiners at the end of each semester for every graduating student. Please be sure to file an Application for Graduation (see §1.7) early in your final semester so that we will know you plan to graduate.

If you have any questions about the Illinois bar exam or about the registration or application process, you may call the Illinois Board of Admissions to the Bar at 217/522-5917.

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§ 1.10     Degree with Honors

The Juris Doctor degree is conferred by the University upon students who are recommended by the Dean and faculty of the Law School after successful completion of all degree requirements. On recommendation of the faculty, degrees may be awarded cum laude, magna cum laude, and summa cum laude. Under current practice, students who rank in the top 1% of their class are awarded their degrees summa cum laude; those who rank in the remainder of the top 10% of their class are awarded their degrees magna cum laude; and those who rank in the remainder of the top 25% of their class are awarded their degrees cum laude. Students who graduate in August and December are ranked with the succeeding May graduating class.

Under current practice, students who earn the LL.M. degree in International and Comparative Law degree will graduate with Honors if they achieve cumulative GPAs of at least 3.750. Students who earn the LL.M. degree in International Intellectual Property will graduate with Honors if they earn grades of B+ or better in the Graduate Seminar in International Intellectual Property and achieve cumulative GPAs of at least 3.500, and will graduate with High Honors if they earn grades of A in the Graduate Seminar in International Intellectual Property and achieve cumulative GPAs of at least 3.750. Students who earn the LL.M. degree in Taxation will graduate with Honors if they attain cumulative GPAs of at least 3.250 and with High Honors if they attain GPAs of at least 3.750. There are no Honors designations for students who earn the LL.M. degree in Financial Services.

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§ 1.11     The Order of the Coif

J.D. graduates who rank in the top 10% of the graduating class are eligible for election to membership in The Order of the Coif, if they otherwise meet the membership criteria of the Order. The faculty members of The Order of the Coif elect the new members from among the eligible graduates.

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§ 1.12     Law Review Eligibility

(a) Eligibility by Academic Achievement

The following students will be invited to join the Chicago-Kent Law Review at the end of each academic year: (1) students who have completed only one academic year as full-time Day Division students who rank in the top 7% of the full-time Day Division class (not divided into sections); (2) students who have completed only one academic year as part-time Day Division students or as Evening Division students who rank in the top 7% of the combined part-time Day Division and Evening Division class; and (3) students who have completed at least one academic year, but not more than two academic years, as part-time Day Division students or as Evening Division students who rank within the top 7% of the combined class comprised of first-year full-time Day Division students, second-year part-time Day Division students, and second-year Evening Division students.

(b) Eligibility by Successful Summer Candidacy Program Participation

    (1) The Summer Candidacy Program typically consists of writing a comment on a legal topic chosen by the Law Review Executive Board. The paper is usually a closed research problem, due on a designated date in July. Exact program dates and requirements are announced by the Law Review each Spring. The Law Review Executive Board selects which students, if any, will be invited to join the staff based on evaluation of the case comments submitted.

    (2) The following students are eligible to participate in the Law Review Summer Candidacy Program if at the time of their eligibility they have a cumulative GPA of at least 3.000: (1) students who have completed only one academic year as full-time Day Division students; (2) students who have completed at least one academic year, but not more than two academic years, as part-time Day Division students or as Evening Division students; and (3) transfer students who have completed at least two semesters (but no more than three semesters) of academic work at Chicago-Kent, and who were not enrolled at Chicago-Kent at the end of their first year (for full-time Day Division students) or second year (for part-time Day Division or Evening Division students). Students who do not qualify for any of the above categories are eligible to participate in the Summer Candidacy Program if they meet the following requirements: (1) they have completed at least one academic year at Chicago-Kent; and (2) they have a GPA of at least 3.250 at the end of the Spring semester immediately prior to the Summer Candidacy Program. No student may participate in the Summer Candidacy Program unless he or she will be in residence at Chicago-Kent for at least two full semesters following that Summer.

    (3) Students who will not be in Chicago during the Summer of their eligibility may still participate in the program, but should contact the Law Review as soon as possible after the program dates are announced to make the necessary arrangements.

    (4) For purposes of Law Review academic or Summer candidacy eligibility, "completing" an academic year means that a student earned sufficient credit to be ranked with the corresponding Day/Evening Divisions combined class for the student's particular graduation year. Class rank and graduation year information is determined by the Registrar.

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§ 1.13      Moot Court Honor Society Eligibility

A student may receive an invitation to join the Moot Court Honor Society based on performance in either (1) the Charles Evans Hughes Moot Court Oral Arguments, in which all first-year students participate as a required part of the Legal Writing 2 curriculum, or (2) the Moot Court Honor Society Summer Candidacy Program. Students who argue in the final (second) round of the Hughes Arguments in the first year of law school and finish in the top 10% of all students who competed on a problem-by-problem basis, and who earn at least a B+ in Legal Writing 2, receive invitations to join the Society, provided that they meet the minimum cumulative GPA requirement discussed below. Students may participate in the Summer Candidacy Program in any Summer, provided they will be in residence at Chicago-Kent for at least two full semesters following that Summer. A grade of B+ in Legal Writing 2 is not required to participate in the Summer Candidacy Program.

In addition to fulfilling the requirements discussed above, a student must have at least a 3.000 GPA at the completion of the Spring semester immediately preceding the Summer Candidacy Program in order to be eligible for membership by either selection process discussed above. Any student, however, who otherwise qualifies for automatic membership based on performance in the Hughes Arguments and Legal Writing 2, but who fails to qualify for automatic membership because he or she has a cumulative GPA below 3.000, may petition the Moot Court Honor Society Executive Board to participate in the Summer Candidacy Competition.

A student who receives an invitation to join the Moot Court Honor Society may defer acceptance of the invitation for no more than one year with permission of the Director of Appellate Advocacy. Deferral is typically granted if (1) the student also has been invited to join the Chicago-Kent Law Review and has accepted that invitation, or (2) the student will be a second-year part-time Day Division student or a second-year Evening Division student and wishes to begin Moot Court membership in the Fall of his or her third year.

All new members of the Moot Court Honor Society are required to register for Appellate Advocacy in their first semester of membership. Appellate Advocacy is offered only in the Fall semester, so students must begin their membership in the Fall semester. A student may not receive credit for more than five hours of Moot Court Honor Society, including the two hours of Appellate Advocacy. Appellate Advocacy is a two-hour graded course that may not be taken on a pass/fail basis.  See also the requirements set forth in §§1.15 and 2.5.

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§ 1.14     Intellectual Property Moot Court Eligibility

To receive credit for Intellectual Property Moot Court, the following requirements must be met: (1) the student must have completed Legal Writing 2; (2) the student may not have participated more than two semesters in the Moot Court Society; (3) the student must adequately complete briefs per competition rules as determined by the Intellectual Property Law Society's coach and faculty advisor; and (4) the student must participate in at least two arguments in an intramural round robin of oral argument, one argument on each side. Also see the requirements set forth in §§1.15 and 2.5.

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§ 1.15     Credit for Moot Court Participation

Except as noted below, the following rules must be followed to earn credit for participation in the Moot Court Honor Society, BLSA Moot Court, Environmental Moot Court, Intellectual Property Moot Court, International Moot Court, and any other moot court competition activity.

A student may earn only one credit hour per semester for participation in a Moot Court program (except for the Appellate Advocacy class), subject to the following conditions:

    (1) In order to earn the one credit, the student must fulfill the program requirements for obtaining credit, and the requirements must include substantial participation in an Interscholastic Moot Court competition or the Moot Court Honor Society's Spring Intramural Competition.

    (2) A student may earn no more than one credit for each Interscholastic Moot Court competition in which he or she participates, and such credit shall be awarded in the semester in which the competition takes place.

    (3) A student may earn no more than one credit in total for participation in the Moot Court Honor Society's Spring Intramural Competition,  and such credit shall be awarded in the semester in which the competition takes place. 

    (4) A student may earn no more than one credit in total for coaching a Moot Court team, but only for coaching a team entered in a competition sponsored by the Moot Court Honor Society, and such credit shall be awarded in the semester in which the competition takes place.

    (5) To be eligible to participate in the International Law Moot Court, a student must have completed or be taking International Advanced Research.

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§ 1.16     Certificate in Environmental and Energy Law

A student may earn a Certificate in Environmental and Energy Law, in addition to the J.D. degree, by participating in the Program in Environmental and Energy Law. A student joins the Program after the first year of law school by notifying the director of her/his interest.

A participant in the Program must take the following courses: Environmental Law and Policy 1 and 2, Legal Writing 4 (a section designated for the Program), and Energy Law. Additionally, students must take at least four more credits, which may be earned by taking any combinaton of the following courses: Environmental Law Clinic (1 credit, 3 credit, or 4 credit options); Administrative Law (3 credits); Land Use (3 credits); a seminar designated for the Program (2 credits); Advanced Externship with an energy or environmental-related institution) (4 credits). A student may not make the pass/fail election for any course that will be used to fulfill the requirements for the Certificate.

Students must complete an Application for a Certificate and have it approved by a Director of the Program during their last semester. For additional information, contact Prof. Dan Tarlock (room 831, 906-5217).

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§ 1.17     Certificate in International and Comparative Law

A student may earn a Certificate in International and Comparative Law, in addition to the J.D. degree, by successfully completing 14 credit hours of course study in international and comparative law, including one seminar. A student joins the Program after the first year of law school by notifying the directors of her/his interest.

Students must take three of the following four courses: International Law, Comparative Law, International Trade, and International Business Transactions. The remaining hours may be selected from among a variety of elective international law courses including European Community Law, International Human Rights, International Environmental Law, International Aspects of Intellectual Property Law and other international studies courses that will be offered from time to time. A student may not make the pass/fail election for any course which will be used to fulfill the requirements for the Certificate. Independent Research under the supervision of an international law faculty member or participation in the Jessup Competition may account for two credit hours of participation in the program.

Students must complete an Application for a Certificate and have it approved by a Director of the Program during their last semester. For additional information, contact the co-directors of the Program, who serve as advisors to the students in the Program: Prof. Bart Brown (room 855, 906-5046), or Prof. David Gerber (room 733, 906-5032).

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§ 1.18     Certificate in Intellectual Property Law

A student may earn a Certificate in Intellectual Property Law, in addition to the J.D. degree, by participating in the Program in Intellectual Property Law. To earn the Certificate, a student must successfully complete 20 credit hours of approved course work: the three core Intellectual Property courses (Patent Law, Copyright Law, and Trademarks and Unfair Competition); a Capstone Experience (Intellectual Property Clinic, Intellectual Property Externship, Strategies in Intellectual Property Law, or any other course designated by the Director of the Program); and 8 credit hours from a list of optional courses. A student may not make the pass/fail election for any course used to fulfill the requirements for the Certificate. (Please note: Students who began their second year of law studies prior to Fall 2002 are subject to an earlier set of Certificate requirements; see the Program web site or the Director of the Program.)

Every prospective Certificate student must complete a Letter of Intent and submit it to the Director of the Program. In the final semester prior to graduation, the student must complete an Application for the Certificate and submit it to the Director.

Details about the Certificate and copies of the required forms are available at http://www.kentlaw.edu/depts/ipp/requirements.html or from the Director of the Program, Professor Graeme Dinwoodie (Room 729; 312/906-5138; gdinwood@kentlaw.edu).

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§ 1.19     Certificate in Labor and Employment Law

A student may earn a Certificate in Labor and Employment Law, in addition to the J.D. degree, by participating in the Program in Labor and Employment Law. The Program is a component of the Law School's Institute for Law and the Workplace, which also sponsors conferences and symposia dealing with current workplace issues. To earn the Certificate, a student must successfully complete the following course of study: the three core Labor and Employment courses (Labor Law, Employment Relationships, and Employment Discrimination); a specialized version of Legal Writing 4 focusing on Labor and Employment Law; a practicum course (Employment Law Clinic, Labor/Employment Law Externship, or Employment Litigation); an elective designated for the program; and a seminar designated for the Program.  A student may not make the pass/fail election for any course used to fulfill the requirements for the Certificate.

Every prospective Certificate student must notify the Director of the Institute after the student's first year of law school of his or her interest. In the final semester prior to graduation, the student must complete an Application for the Certificate and submit it to the Director.

Details about the Certificate are available at http://www.kentlaw.edu/academics/plel/ about.html or from the Director of the Institute, Professor Martin Malin (Room 843; 312/906-5056; mmalin@kentlaw.edu), or the Assistant Director, Professor Mary Rose Strubbe (Room 865; 312/906-5288; mstrubbe@kentlaw.edu).

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§ 1.20     Certificate in Litigation and Alternative Dispute Resolution (LADR)

A student may earn a Certificate in Litigation and Alternative Dispute Resolution, in addition to the J.D. degree, by successfully completing the requirements of the LADR Program. Students in the LADR Program learn traditional doctrinal and case analysis along with the theoretical and ethical foundations of law and receive training in legal research and writing, trial skills, negotiation and mediation, and clinical education.

Full-time Day Division students apply for admission into the LADR Program during their second semester of law school (the Spring semester of their first year) and begin the LADR curriculum in at the beginning of their second year. Part-time Day Division and Evening Division students may apply in either their second or fourth semesters and typically begin the LADR curriculum at the beginning of their third year. Thirty students are admitted into the program each year.

Students admitted into the LADR Program in Spring 2004 or thereafter will receive the LADR Certificate if they successfully complete five lawyering process courses and two doctrinal courses, as follows: (A) Lawyering Process Courses: Pretrial Litigation; Trial Advocacy 1; In-House Clinic; Judicial Externship or a second semester of In-House Clinic; and Mediation and Other ADR Procedures Clinic. (B) Doctrinal Courses: Evidence; and one course from the following list: Federal Courts, Criminal Procedure: The Adjudicative Process, Criminal Procedure: The Investigative Process, Civil Procedure 2, Complex Litigation, Appellate Courts and Procedure, or a similar course approved the by the LADR Faculty Committee. Students admitted into the LADR Program prior to Spring 2004 should consult with the Director of Clinical Education about the LADR Certificate requirements.

Successful completion of Pretrial Litigation and a series of classes on advanced research will exempt LADR students from the Legal Writing 4 requirement. LADR students are not exempt from Legal Writing 3. A student may not make the pass/fail election for any course used to fulfill the requirements for the Certificate. Students in the LADR Program may not enroll in any ADR, Negotiation, or Mediation course not designated as a LADR course.

Details about the LADR Program are available at http://www.kentlaw.edu/academics/
jdcert/ladr_pgm.html
or from the Director of Clinical Education, Professor Gary Laser (Room 631; 312/906-5070; glaser@kentlaw.edu).

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§ 1.21     Joint J.D./LL.M. in Taxation

Enrollment in the joint J.D./LL.M. Program in Taxation enables a student to obtain an LL.M. in Taxation by completing as few as six LL.M. courses after receiving the J.D. degree. A student may enroll in the Program after completing Law 276, Personal Income Tax. To enroll, a student must be in the upper one-third of his or her class, or receive the permission of the Director of the Program, and must complete a Registration as a JD/LL.M. Student form in the Registrar's office. While a J.D. student, the joint degree candidate will take at least four, but not more than six, courses in the LL.M. Program, which will count toward the hours required for theJ.D. degree. A student is not permitted to take more than six LL.M. courses prior to earning the J.D. degree, even if the student does not intend to count the additional courses for J.D. credit. Grades received in LL.M. courses are counted in the student's J.D. grade point average. The grade point values of LL.M. grades will be based on the J.D. scale in Handbook §6.1; a J.D. student may not be awarded an A+. An LL.M. course may not be taken on a pass/fail basis. Tuition for LL.M. courses will be charged at the J.D. rate until the J.D. degree is received.

After earning the J.D. degree, the student will take additional LL.M. courses until twelve LL.M. courses (seven required and five elective) have been successfully completed, including the LL.M. courses taken while a J.D. student. To receive the LL.M. degree, the student must complete the twelve LL.M. tax courses within a five-year period and must attain a cumulative GPA of at least 2.500 for all LL.M. courses taken, including those taken while a J.D. student.

A student will not receive credit toward the LL.M. degree for J.D. tax courses taken. If, however, both a J.D. tax course and an LL.M. tax course are offered in the same subject, and that subject is either one of the seven required LL.M. tax courses or a prerequisite for an LL.M. tax course, those requirements may be waived for a J.D. student in the joint program who has received non-pass/fail credit for the J.D. course, but the student must still take a total of twelve LL.M. tax courses to receive the LL.M. degree. For additional information, contact the Director of the Graduate Program in Taxation, Professor Gerald Brown (Room 615; 312/906-5071; gbrown@kentlaw.edu).

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§ 1.22      Joint J.D./LL.M. in Financial Services Law

Enrollment in the joint J.D./LL.M. Program in Financial Services Law enables a student to obtain an LL.M. in Financial Services Law within one semester after receiving the J.D. degree. A student may enroll in the Program after completing Law 276, Personal Income Tax and Law 409, Business Organizations. To enroll, a student must have a cumulative GPA of at least 3.200, or receive the permission of the Director of the Program, and must complete a Registration as a JD/LL.M. Student form in the Registrar's office. While a J.D. student, the joint degree candidate must take Law 361, Securities Regulation, for J.D. credit. While a J.D. student, the joint degree candidate make take no more than twelve LL.M. credits, which will count toward the hours required for the J.D. degree. A student is not permitted to take more than twelve LL.M. credits prior to earning the J.D. degree, even if the student does not intend to count the additional courses for J.D. credit. Grades received in LL.M. courses are counted in the student's J.D. grade point average. An LL.M. course may not be taken on a pass/fair basis. Tuition for LL.M. courses will be charged at the J.D. rate until the J.D. degree is received.

After earning the J.D. degree, the student will take additional LL.M. courses until twenty-four LL.M credits have been successfully completed, including the LL.M. courses taken while a J.D. student. To receive the LL.M. degree, the student must complete the twenty-four LL.M. financial services credits within a six-year period and must attain a cumulative GPA of at least 3.000 for all LL.M. courses taken, including those taken while a J.D. student.

A student will not receive credit toward the LL.M. degree for J.D. courses taken, including Law 361, Securities Regulation. For additional information, contact the Director of the Graduate Program in Financial Services Law, Professor Henry H. Perritt, Jr. (Room 713; 312/906-5098; hperritt@kentlaw.edu).

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§ 1.23      Joint J.D./M.B.A. (Masters in Business Administration)

Students who wish to enroll in the joint J.D./Masters in Business Administration program must be accepted by the Stuart Graduate School of Business into the M.B.A. program. Joint Program students may apply up to five approved M.B.A. courses taken at the Stuart Graduate School toward the requirements for the J.D. degree. An M.B.A. Course Request for J.D./M.B.A. Students form must be completed before the course begins for each M.B.A. course the student intends to apply to the J.D. requirements. No credit may be applied toward the J.D. degree for courses completed prior to the commencement of law studies.

To receive J.D. credit for a course, the student must earn at least a C in the course. Students receive 2.4 credit hours toward the J.D. degree for each M.B.A. course successfully completed, up to a maximum of 12 hours. If a student takes fewer than five M.B.A. courses, the student will receive 2.4 credit hours per course, rounded down to the nearest whole number. The M.B.A. course grades will not count in the student's J.D. grade point average. For additional information and program requirements, contact Dean Sowle for Law School information or Suzanne Weiss (Room 483; 312/906-6544; sweiss@stuart.iit.edu) for Stuart School information.

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§ 1.24      Joint J.D./M.S. in Financial Markets

Students who wish to enroll in the joint J.D./M.S. in Financial Markets Program must be accepted by the Center for Law and Financial Markets into the M.S. Program. Joint Program students may apply up to five approved M.S. courses taken at the Center for Law and Financial Markets toward the requirements for the J.D. degree. No credit may be applied toward the J.D. degree for courses completed prior to the commencement of law studies.  To receive J.D. credit for a course, the student must earn at least a C in the course. Students receive 2.4 credit hours toward the J.D. degree for each M.S. course successfully completed, up to a maximum of 12 hours. If a student takes fewer than five M.S. courses, the student will receive 2.4 credit hours per course, rounded down to the nearest whole number. The M.S. course grades will not count in the student's J.D. grade point average.  For additional information and program requirements, contact Dean Sowle for law school information or Nidhi Singh (nsingh@clfm.kentlaw.edu) for information regarding the Center for Law and Financial Markets.

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§ 1.25      Joint J.D./M.S. in Environmental Management

Students who wish to enroll in the joint J.D./M.E.M. program must be accepted by the Stuart School into the M.E.M. program and complete a Registration as a J.D./M.E.M. Student form in the Registrar's office. Joint Program students may apply up to five approved M.E.M. courses taken at the Stuart School of Business toward the requirements for the J.D. degree.  A J.D./M.E.M. Course Request form must be completed before the course begins for each M.E.M. course the student intends to apply to the J.D. requirements. No credit may be applied toward the J.D. degree for courses completed prior to the commencement of law studies.

To receive J.D. credit for a course, the student must earn at least a C in the course. Students receive 2.4 credit hours toward the J.D. degree for each M.E.M. course successfully completed, up to a maximum of 12 hours. If a student takes fewer than five M.E.M. courses, the student will receive 2.4 credit hours per course, rounded down to the nearest whole number. The M.E.M. course grades will not count in the student's J.D. grade point average. For additional information and program requirements, contact Dean Sowle for law school information or Dean Zia Hassan (room 430C; phone 906-6515)  for business school information.

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§ 1.26      Joint J.D./M.P.A. (Masters in Public Administration)

Students who wish to enroll in the joint J.D./M.P.A. program must be accepted into the M.P.A. program and complete a Registration as a J.D./M.P.A. Student form in the Registrar's office. Joint Program students may apply up to five approved M.P.A. courses taken at the Stuart School of Business toward the requirements for the J.D. degree.  A J.D./M.P.A. Course Request form must be completed before the course begins for each M.P.A. course the student intends to apply to the J.D. requirements. No credit may be applied toward the J.D. degree for courses completed prior to the commencement of law studies.

To receive J.D. credit for a course, the student must earn at least a C in the course. Students receive 3 credit hours toward the J.D. degree for each M.P.A. course successfully completed, up to a maximum of 12 hours. The M.P.A. course grades will not count in the student's J.D. grade point average. For additional information and program requirements, contact Dean Sowle for law school information or David Beam, Director of the M.P.A. Program (room 540, 906-5196).

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§ 1.27     London Law Consortium

Chicago-Kent is a member of the London Law Consortium, which operates a semester abroad program each Spring semester in London. Students who attend the program must pay the regular rate of tuition to Chicago-Kent and additional program fees to the Consortium. Living expenses, airfare, books, and materials are also additional costs. Information about this program is available in Dean Sowle's office.

Students who attend the program may elect to receive the grades earned or may take the courses on a pass/fail basis. The election, which will apply to all courses taken in the program, must be made prior to the commencement of the program by completing a form in the Registrar's office. This pass/fail election will not be counted within the six hours of elective pass/fail courses available under §2.4.

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SECTION II. STUDY LOAD, COURSE, AND WORK LIMITATIONS

§ 2.1     Maximum Credit Hours

Full-time Day Division students may register for a maximum of 16 credit hours per semester (17 if registered for Law Review or Moot Court Honor Society). Part-time Day Division students and Evening Division students may register for a maximum of 11 credit hours per semester (12 if registered for Law Review or Moot Court Honor Society). All students may register for a maximum of six credit hours during a Summer session. The maximum hour limitation applies to all courses the student is taking that are to be applied to the J.D. degree. For example, if a full-time Day Division student takes 14 credit hours of law courses, the student may not receive credit for more than two hours of graduate courses in the Stuart Graduate School of Business or in any other graduate school for credit toward the J.D. degree.

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§ 2.2      Minimum Credit Hours

Full-time Day Division students must register for a minimum of twelve credit hours per semester, except graduating seniors who need fewer than twelve credit hours to graduate. Part-time Day Division students and Evening Division students must register for a minimum of eight credit hours per semester, except graduating seniors who need fewer than eight credit hours to graduate. However, senior students should refer to the residency requirements set forth in §1.5.

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§ 2.3     Seminar Limitation

A student may not receive credit toward graduation for more than six credit hours of seminar work.

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§ 2.4     Pass/Fail Election

A student in good standing may elect to take six credit hours on a pass/fail basis in accordance with the limitations of this section, provided that the student designates such an election by the end of the second week of the Fall semester, the end of the fourth week of the Spring semester, and the end of the first week of the Summer session.  After the deadline, the student may not convert from the standard grading system to pass/fail.  However, a student may revoke the pass/fail election and convert from the pass/fail election to the standard grading system at any time up to the last day of classes for the semester or the Summer term. A student may not revoke a revocation and re-elect the pass/fail option after the deadline for making the pass/fail election. No more than six credit hours taken under this election will count toward the graduation credit requirement. A student may submit election forms for up to six hours of pass/fail; forms submitted that exceed six hours are null and void.  If a student goes on academic probation, all pass/fail elections the student made for the probationary semester are nullified.

In order to earn the grade of Pass in a course for which the pass/fail election has been made, the student must earn at least the grade of C. If a student earns a C- or lower, the student will be awarded the grade of LP (Low Pass). See also the requirements set forth in §6.6.

The pass/fail election does not apply to: (1) a course required for the degree, including Professional Responsibility; (2) a seminar, whether or not being taken to fulfill the seminar requirement; (3) a course that has been designated by the instructor before registration as unavailable for the pass/fail election; (4) a course offered only on a pass/fail basis, such as Law Review, Moot Court, and clinical courses; (5) LL.M. courses; (6) Appellate Advocacy and Trial Advocacy courses; or (7) any course being taken to fulfill the requirements of any certificate program.

A student may not receive credit toward graduation for more than 19 credit hours graded on a pass/fail basis, including courses taken under this election and the courses listed in §2.7.

Note: Credits for which a student may only receive a pass/fail grade, such as Law Review, Moot Court Honor Society, clinical courses, Independent Research, or credits transferred from another law school, do not affect a student's right to elect six hours of pass/fail credits under this section.

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§ 2.5     Law Review and Moot Court Credit Hour Limitation

A student may receive no more than five hours of credit toward graduation for participation in Law Review, and no more than one credit hour per semester. A student may receive no more than a total of five credits toward graduation for participation in the Appellate Advocacy course, Moot Court Honor Society, BLSA Moot Court, Environmental Moot Court, International Moot Court, Intellectual Property Moot Court, and any other moot court program. With the exception of the Appellate Advocacy course, a student may take no more than one credit hour per semester of any moot court activity listed herein. A student may not take any moot court credits while enrolled in Appellate Advocacy. The Law Review and moot court credit-hour limitations are separate; a student may earn five credit hours for Law Review and an additional five credit hours for Moot Court, subject to the limitations in §2.7.

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§ 2.6     Clinical Course 16 Credit Hour and Externship Limitations

A student may receive no more than 16 credit hours toward graduation for the following courses combined: In-House clinical courses, Legal Externship, Business Entity Formation, Judicial Externship, and Interviewing and Counseling (Advice Desk). In addition, a student may not enroll for more than two semesters of Judicial Externship. Students in the Litigation and Alternative Dispute Resolution Program (LADR) are exempt from the 16-credit-hour limitation of this section.

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§ 2.7  Non-Classroom Course and Pass/Fail 19 Credit Hour Limitation

A student may not receive credit toward graduation for more than 19 credit hours taken in the following courses or areas combined: In-House clinical courses, Judicial Externship, Legal Externship, Interviewing and Counseling (Advice Desk), Mediation Practice, Independent Research, Law Review, Moot Court Honor Society, moot court competitions receiving academic credit, and Legal Writing and Academic Support Program teaching assistantships. All of these courses are graded only on a pass/fail basis. The 19 credit hour limitation also includes the credit hours for which a pass/fail election was made pursuant to §2.4 and to credits earned at other law schools' Summer programs, whether in the United States or abroad. However, the limitation in this section does not apply to credits taken with permission at other law schools during the regular academic year.

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§ 2.8      Employment Limitation for Full-Time Day Division Students

ABA accreditation rules and Law School regulations provide that full-time Day Division students may not be employed for more than 20 hours per week while school is in session. If a full-time Day Division student must work more than 20 hours per week, the student must transfer to the part-time Day Division or the Evening Division.

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§ 2.9     Exceptions to Limitations

Subject to the limitations described below, the Assistant Dean for Academic Administration and Student Affairs may grant an exception to any of the provisions in this section if a student has compelling extenuating circumstances. To request an exception, a student must submit a petition to the Assistant Dean setting forth in detail the circumstances necessitating the exception. The faculty does not recognize a desire to accelerate the date of graduation as a valid reason to exceed the maximum number of credit hours in a semester.

The Assistant Dean for Academic Administration and Student Affairs may not grant an exception to the maximum credit requirement that would violate any applicable ABA accreditation rule concerning the maximum number of credits that students may take in a single semester. The Assistant Dean for Academic Administration and Student Affairs may not grant permission for a student taking more than 12 credits to be employed more than 20 hours a week.

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§ 2.10      Hour Requirements for Financial Aid and Loan Deferment Purposes

See §13.1 for the number of hours required to be considered full-time or part-time for financial aid and loan deferral purposes.

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§ 2.11      Legal Writing and Academic Support Program Teaching Assistant Limitations

A student may not receive credit toward graduation for more than four credit hours as a Legal Writing Teaching Assistant or for more than four credit hours as an Academic Support Program Teaching Assistant.

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SECTION III. REGISTRATION PROCEDURES

§ 3.1     Official Registration Required

A student may not receive credit for a course unless the student is properly registered for the section of the course for which the grade was submitted.

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§ 3.2     Registration Priority

Day Division students have priority for Day Division classes; Evening Division students have priority for Evening Division classes. For classes in the 4:00 time slot, seats are allocated proportionately between Day Division and Evening Division. Within divisions, registration priority is based on anticipated graduation date, with the earliest graduation date having the highest priority.

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§ 3.3     Sequence of Required Courses 

Students must take all required courses at the time prescribed and in the sequence designated in the registration instructions. First-year students are not permitted to change programs, drop required courses, take Incompletes in required courses, or take a reduced class load; see §3.10(c).

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§ 3.4     Registration for In-House Clinical Programs

Prior to registration, the Law Offices will solicit applications for positions for the next semester. If more students apply than can be accepted, a lottery will be held to select the students who may register. A list of the students authorized to register for the In-House Clinical Programs will be published prior to the commencement of registration.

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§ 3.5     Registration for Externships

(a) Legal Externship. The Legal Externship Program is a 4-credit-hour, pass/fail program that enables a law student to receive academic credit for working 16 hours a week in an approved legal placement under the supervision of a designated attorney. Legal Externship consists primarily of a fieldwork experience under a supervising lawyer approved by the Law School, supplemented by individual and group meetings throughout the semester between the extern and Professor Vivien Gross. Students must meet with Prof. Vivien Gross (vgross@kentlaw.edu) to apply. Externships are available for the Fall and Spring semesters and the Summer term.

(b) Judicial Externship. The Judicial Externship Program is a 4-credit-hour, pass/fail program that enables students to work for participating federal court judges and magistrate judges. There is an accompanying classroom component that focuses on aspects of judicial decision-making and their effect on the extern's work product. Judicial Externship is open to Chicago-Kent students in their second and third year who possess the requisite minimum G.P.A. (approximately top 25%). Judges select their externs only through Chicago-Kent's formal application process and do not accept applications directly from students. To register, students must be selected through the law school's application process and obtain permission from Professor Vivien Gross (vgross@kentlaw.edu). Applications are available in mid-February for Summer and Fall externships and in late September for Spring externships. A student may enroll for only one Judicial Externship per semester and for a maximum of two Judicial Externships.

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§ 3.6     Registration for LL.M. Courses

See §§1.21 and 1.22 for information on the joint J.D./LL.M. degree programs in Taxation and Financial Services. Students in the joint programs must consult with the program directors before registering for LL.M. courses. Non-joint degree students may register for graduate Taxation courses only with the permission of Professor Gerald Brown. Non-joint degree students may register for graduate Financial Services courses provided the student is in his or her final year of Law School and has a 3.200 cumulative GPA or the permission of the director of the program.

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§ 3.7     Registration for Independent Research

To register for Independent Research, a student must make arrangements with a full-time faculty member and submit an Independent Research form approved by the faculty member and the Assistant Dean for Academic Administration and Student Affairs. The work assigned for Independent Research should have the equivalent educational value as that assigned for Independent Research In Lieu of a Seminar described in §1.3.  The course is graded on a pass/fail basis only; a student may not earn a letter grade for Independent Research. A student may earn only one hour of Independent Research credit per semester.

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§ 3.8     Registration for Intensive Trial Advocacy

Students must be in good academic standing to enroll in Intensive Trial Advocacy 1. Students in Intensive Trial Advocacy 1 must enroll in Trial Advocacy 2 in the succeeding Spring semester. Intensive Trial Advocacy 1 grades are counted in the Fall semester GPA, but the credit hours do not count toward the maximum number of credit hours permitted in the Fall semester.

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§ 3.9     Registration for Courses in Another Division

Students must register for at least one-half of their credit hours in the division in which they are enrolled each semester. Required courses must be taken in the division in which the student is enrolled; elective courses may be taken in the other division. Courses that meet at 4:00 p.m. are considered both Day Division and Evening Division courses. Except for the Saturday sections of Trial Advocacy, all Trial Advocacy courses are considered Evening Division courses.

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§ 3.10     Adding and Dropping Courses

(a) Program Changes

Changes to a student's class schedule may only be made through the online registration system, available through the Registrar's office home page and the main Student Portal page. Courses may be added or dropped according to the following rules.

(b) Adding Courses

Students may add open courses in either division (subject to the limitation in §3.9) without special permission during the first week of the semester. During the second week of the semester, students may add an open course only with permission of the instructor. Students may not add a course after the second week of the semester. During the Summer session, a course may not be added after the first week of classes.

(c) Dropping Courses

Courses may be dropped at any time before the final exam or, if there is no final exam in the course, before the date the final paper or other final assignment is due. A required course may not be dropped without the permission of the Assistant Dean for Academic Administration and Student Affairs. First-year students are not permitted to change programs, drop required courses, take Incompletes in required courses, or take a reduced class load; see §3.3. A student may withdraw from a clinical course at any time prior to the end of the eighth week of classes during a regular semester and prior to the end of the fourth week of classes during a Summer session.

If a course is dropped by the end of the second week of the semester, no record of the course will appear on the student's transcript. A course dropped after the second week will appear on the student's transcript with the grade of WP (Withdrew Passing), which has no effect on the student's GPA.

The tuition refund policy for dropping courses after the beginning of the semester is contained in §12.10.

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§ 3.11     Changing Divisions

A student who wants to change from the Evening to the Day Division, or vice versa, must submit a request to change divisions to the Registrar by the date announced in the Record. Changes are permitted on a space-available basis. If all students can be accommodated, all will be permitted to change divisions; if all students cannot be accommodated, a lottery drawing will be held to determine which students will be permitted to change. First-year students are not eligible to change divisions until after the completion of the first year.

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§ 3.12     Class Attendance in Proper Section

Students are required to attend the section of a course for which they are registered. A student may not attend another section of the same course, even if taught by the same instructor.

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§ 3.13     Auditing Classes

A J.D. student may audit a course only if (1) the student registers to audit the course by the end of the period prescribed for adding courses (see §3.10(b)), (2) permission of the instructor to audit is obtained prior to the student's registering to audit, and (3) tuition is paid for the course. An auditor receives neither a grade nor credit for the course, but the fact of auditing will appear on the student's transcript. After the period for adding courses has expired, the student may not convert from auditing to graded status or from graded to auditing status. A student who has audited a course may not thereafter take that course for credit without the permission of the Assistant Dean for Academic Administration and Student Affairs. A person not enrolled as a student at the Law School may audit a course only with the permission of the Assistant Dean and the instructor.

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SECTION IV. WITHDRAWAL AND REENTRY TO THE LAW SCHOOL

§ 4.1     Withdrawal or Transferring From the Law School

To withdraw from the Law School in good standing (either during or between semesters), the student must complete a Withdrawal form and have it signed by the Assistant Dean for Academic Administration and Student Affairs. The Withdrawal form is required whether the student is permanently withdrawing, withdrawing for one or more semesters with the intention of returning to Chicago-Kent, or transferring to another law school. If a student withdraws during a semester, the student must also drop all of his or her courses using the online registration system. To reenter the Law School in a later semester, a Reentry form must be completed. The next sections of the Handbook set forth the rules regarding reentry.

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§ 4.2     Reentry Before Completion of One Semester

(a) A student who withdraws from the Law School with good cause before the completion of one semester may automatically reenter the Law School the next Fall semester in the division in which the student was originally enrolled, provided the student notifies the Assistant Dean for Admissions in writing of his or her intention to reenter by May 15 of the next year. If notification is not received by May 15, reentry shall be permitted on a space-available basis only. Good cause will be determined by the Assistant Dean for Academic Administration and Student Affairs at the time of the withdrawal and includes, but is not limited to, medical or financial hardship. The reasons for the withdrawal must be set forth on the Withdrawal form.

(b) A student who withdraws from the Law School without good cause before the completion of one semester will be considered a new applicant and may reenter only with the approval of the Admissions Committee and must comply with all the steps and procedures required of all new applicants to the Law School.

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§ 4.3      Reentry After Completion of One Semester, But Before One Year

(a) A student who withdraws with good cause after completion of the first semester but before completion of the first year may automatically reenter the Law School within two years from the time of withdrawal in the same division in which the student was originally enrolled, provided the student notifies the Assistant Dean for Admissions in writing of his or her intention to reenter by May 15 of the year of reentry. If notification is not received by May 15, readmission shall be permitted on a space-available basis only. Good cause will be determined in the manner provided in §4.2(a).

(b) A student who withdraws without good cause after completion of the first semester but before completion of the first year, or a student who withdraws with good cause after one semester but does not reenter within two years, may reenter only with the approval of the Admissions Committee and must comply with all the steps and procedures required of all new applicants to the Law School.

(c) In the event of readmission under §4.3(a) or (b) within two years, the grades earned in completed courses will appear on the transcript and will be counted in the student's GPA. In the event the student is readmitted by the Admissions Committee more than two years after the student withdrew, the Assistant Dean for Academic Administration and Student Affairs will determine which grades and credits earned in completed courses, if any, will be reflected on the transcript and will be counted in the student's GPA.

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§ 4.4     Reentry After Completion of at Least One Year

(a) A student in good standing after completion of at least one year may be absent from the Law School for any reason for a maximum of four academic semesters. A Summer session does not constitute an academic semester. An "absent semester" includes any semester in which a student withdraws or fails to register. The "absent semesters" may be consecutive or non-consecutive. A student who has not been absent more than four semesters is entitled to automatic readmission.

(b) If a student who has been absent four semesters wishes to be absent an additional semester, the student must petition the Assistant Dean for Academic Administration and Student Affairs before the next absent semester begins, setting forth the reasons an additional absent semester is requested. The Assistant Dean may grant approval for an additional absent semester upon a showing of good cause. If the petition is not approved, the student may reenter only with the approval of the faculty. Good cause will be determined in the manner provided in §4.2(a).

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SECTION V. TRANSFER CREDITS FROM OTHER SCHOOLS

§ 5.1      Procedure for Taking Courses at Another Law School

A student seeking permission to take courses at another law school should submit an Application to Visit at Another Law School to the Assistant Dean for Academic Administration and Student Affairs. Credit will be awarded only if the school is ABA-accredited and permission was granted prior to the start of the coursework. The student must arrange to have an official transcript showing the grades earned sent directly by the other law school to the Chicago-Kent Registrar.

If the grade earned in a course is C or higher, the credit hours will be counted toward graduation. The grade will not appear on the student's transcript and will not be computed in the student's GPA. If the grade earned is below C, no credit will be granted for the course and any Federal Stafford Loan money received during this period must be returned to the lender. This will automatically cancel the entire loan. However, a student may reapply for the entire loan for any subsequent semester(s) for which eligibility can be determined. If a student fails to return federal loan money received during this period, all future federal loan eligibility will be immediately revoked.

Credits earned at another law school during the regular academic year do not count toward the 19-credit limitation of §2.7. However, credits earned at other law schools' Summer programs, whether in the United States or abroad, do count toward the 19-credit limitation.

A student may not take a course at another law school on a pass/fail basis. If the course is only graded on a pass/fail basis, a separate Petition must be submitted to the Assistant Dean for Academic Administration and Student Affairs with the Application form requesting to take a pass/fail course at the other school.

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§ 5.2      Courses at Other Chicago-Area Law Schools

A student seeking permission to take a course at another law school in the Chicago area must obtain permission from the Assistant Dean for Academic Administration and Student Affairs, which will be granted only if the course is not offered at Chicago-Kent.

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§ 5.3     Credit Hour Limitations for Courses Taken at Other Law Schools

When a student takes courses at another law school, the maximum number of credit hours permitted for the semester or Summer term at Chicago-Kent (not the school being visited) must be observed.

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§ 5.4      Credit Hours Required for a Chicago-Kent Degree

A student must earn at least 54 credit hours of Chicago-Kent courses in order to receive a Chicago-Kent College of Law degree. These hours do not include courses taken in other academic units within IIT, e.g., M.B.A. courses. Exceptions may be made in appropriate circumstances by the Assistant Dean for Academic Administration and Student Affairs.

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§ 5.5      Procedure to Take Non-Law Courses at Graduate Schools

A student in good standing may receive credit toward the J.D. degree for two non-law graduate-level courses taken after the student has begun law studies. To be eligible for credit, the course must be relevant to or enhance the student's law studies and be approved by the Assistant Dean for Academic Administration and Student Affairs. A student who seeks permission to take a graduate-level course for J.D. credit must submit a Petition to Take Non-Law Graduate Courses to the Assistant Dean and the petition must be approved before the graduate course begins.

A student who receives permission to take a graduate-level course in another academic unit within IIT, or at another university, pursuant to this section must arrange to have an official transcript showing the grades earned sent to the Chicago-Kent Registrar. If the grade earned in the course is B- or higher, the credit hours will be counted toward graduation. The grade will not appear on the student's transcript and will not be computed in the student's GPA. If the grade earned is below B-, no credit will be granted for the course. This section does not apply to students enrolled in the joint J.D./M.B.A. program or other joint programs described in §§ 1.23 to 1.26.

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SECTION VI. GRADING SYSTEM

§ 6.1      Grading Scale

Letter grades, A through E, are assigned in all courses, except the pass/fail courses listed in §2.7 and other courses specifically designated as being graded only on a pass/fail basis. A student may elect to take a letter-graded course on a pass/fail basis in accordance with the provisions of §2.4. No grade will be awarded in a course, whether graded on a letter basis or a pass/fail basis, unless the student is properly registered in the section of the class for which the grade was received. J.D. students taking LL.M. courses may only be awarded grades according to the J.D. grading scale. Grades are awarded on the following scale:

 A4.0 grade points per hour
 A-3.7 grade points per hour
 B+3.3 grade points per hour
 B3.0 grade points per hour
 B-2.7 grade points per hour
 C+2.3 grade points per hour
 C2.0 grade points per hour
 C-1.7 grade points per hour
 D+1.3 grade point per hour
 D1.0 grade point per hour
 D-0.7 grade point per hour
 E(Failure) 0 grade points per hour (no credit earned but will
   count in the student's grade point average)
 WE(Withdrew Failing) 0 grade points per hour (no credit earned
  but will count in the student's grade point average)
 WP(Withdrew Passing) no value assigned (no credit earned)
 I(Incomplete) no value assigned (no credit earned)
 AU(Audit) no value assigned (no credit earned)
 P(Pass) no value assigned (credit earned)
 

LP

(Low Pass) no value assigned (credit earned)*

*The grade of Low Pass is awarded to students who pass a pass/fail course but earn a grade lower than a C; see §6.6.

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§ 6.2      Computation of Grade Point Average

A grade point system is used to determine academic standing. The GPA is computed by dividing the total number of grade points earned by the total number of graded credit hours. Graded credit hours do not include courses graded WP, P, X, or I, but do include grades of E and WE (whether in a graded or pass/fail course).

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§ 6.3     Grade of WP (Withdrew Passing)

If a student withdraws from a course after the second week of classes, the grade of WP (Withdrew Passing) and the course name will appear on the transcript. A WP has no effect on the GPA. An instructor may assign the grade of WP to a student who does not satisfy an attendance requirement.

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§ 6.4     Grade of WE (Withdrew Failing)

A student who is officially registered for a course but who fails to take the final examination, or fails to complete any other requirement for the course without the permission of the instructor, will be assigned the grade of WE. This grade counts in the student's grade point average as a failing grade.

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§ 6.5     Grade of I (Incomplete)

The grade of Incomplete will be assigned to a student who has been excused from taking the final examination on good cause shown, or who, with permission, has failed to complete the required assignments in a course in which written assignments form a basis for the grade. An instructor may assign the grade of Incomplete to a student who has not met the attendance requirement specified. To assign the grade of Incomplete, an Incomplete Grade Agreement must be signed by the faculty member, the student, and the Assistant Dean for Academic Administration and Student Affairs and submitted to the Registrar. First-year students are not permitted to take Incompletes in required courses; see §3.3.

A student must satisfy the requirements set forth in the Incomplete Grade Agreement to have the Incomplete grade replaced with a letter grade and to earn credit for the course. The requirements must be completed within one year from the end of the examination period for the semester in the Incomplete was received. If the terms of the Incomplete Grade Agreement are satisfied by the student, the instructor will indicate a letter grade on the Incomplete Grade Agreement, which will replace the Incomplete grade for the semester in which the Incomplete grade was awarded. If the terms of the Incomplete Agreement are not satisfied by the time specified the Agreement, or within one year if no time is specified, the Incomplete will be replaced with the grade of WE.

A student who is completing the requirements of an Incomplete Grade Agreement during a subsequent semester should not register for the course. Instead, the student must notify the instructor that he or she is making up an Incomplete before attending class, taking an examination, or turning in a paper, and must submit an Incomplete Course Make-up Notice form to the Registrar's office during the first two weeks of the semester.

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§ 6.6     Grades of P (Pass) and LP (Low Pass)

In order to earn the grade of P (Pass) in a course being taken on a pass/fail basis, the student must earn at least the grade of C. If a student earns a C- or lower in a course being taken on a pass/fail basis (but does not fail), the student will be awarded the grade of LP (Low Pass). The LP grade is applicable to all courses and activities being taken on a pass/fail basis, including courses for which the student makes a pass/fail election pursuant to §2.4 and the courses listed in §2.7.

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§ 6.7     Effect of Grades of P (Pass), LP (Low Pass), E (Failure), and WP (Withdrew Failing) on GPA

Credit hours graded as a P (Pass) or LP (Low Pass) are counted toward graduation but have no effect on a student's GPA. If a student receives an E (Failure) or WE (Withdrew Failing), whether in a graded or pass/fail course, the grade will be included in the GPA computation as indicated in §6.2.

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§ 6.8     Grading Curves

Beginning with the Fall 2013 semester, the following curve is mandatory for all required courses, except Legal Writing courses and seminars. The following curve is also highly recommended, but not required, for all elective courses (except Appellate Advocacy and Judicial Externship) if at least 40 students are enrolled.
  
Recommended
Range
Cumulative Range
 A
  5%
  0-10%
  0-10%
 A-
15%
 10-20%
 15-30%
 B+
20%
15-25%
35-50%
 B
25%
20-30%
55-75%
 B-
20%
15-25%
75-90%
 C+
10%
5-15%
85-95%
 C & Lower
5%
5-10%
 

The following curve was in effect prior to Fall 2013 for all required courses, except Legal Writing courses, Professional Responsibility, and seminars.
   
Recommended
Range
Cumulative Range
  A
  5%
  0-10%
  0-10%
  A-
10%
  5-15%
  5-20%
  B+
20%
15-25%
30-40%
  B
20%
15-25%
45-60%
  B-
20%
15-30%
60-80%
  C+
15%
10-20%
80-90%
  C & Lower
10%
10-20%
 

The following curve was in effect prior to Fall 2013 for Professional Responsibility.
  Cumulative  Range
 A- maximum of 30%
 B+ maximum of 50%
 B- maximum of 85%

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§ 6.9     Anonymous Grading

The Law School uses an anonymous grading system. Instructors do not have access to the identity of students while final examinations are being graded. Students are assigned random examination numbers each semester to identify their examinations. The instructor assigns preliminary letter grades to the examinations and submits these letter grades by examination number. The instructor is then given the names of the students matched with each student's preliminary grade. The instructor then has 48 hours to adjust grades according to the criteria announced to the class at the beginning of the semester, such as class participation, attendance, and other factors.

After the professor has submitted final grades, grade changes may only be made pursuant to §6.10. The Registrar's office is not permitted to disclose any information regarding the adjustments instructors made to the grades. The student must contact the instructor for information regarding the grade and adjustment.

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§ 6.10     Change of Grade

Grade changes may be made by an instructor after the 48-hour adjustment period set forth in §6.9 only with the approval of the Assistant Dean for Academic Administration and Student Affairs. The instructor must submit a Grade Change form explaining the reason for the change, which must be signed by the Assistant Dean.

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§ 6.11     Deadline for Submission of Grades

Fall Semesters: Faculty members must submit grades within five weeks after the date of the final examination. If there is no final examination (for example, a seminar where the final grade is based on a paper), grades are due five weeks after the last day of the exam period.

Spring Semesters: Faculty members must submit grades within four weeks after the date of the final examination. If there is no final examination, grades are due four weeks after the last day of the exam period.

Summer Sessions: Summer session grades must be submitted within five weeks after the date of the final examination. If there is no final examination, grades are due five weeks after the last day of the exam period.

Graduating Seniors' Grades: Grades for graduating seniors may be due earlier than other students' grades so the Law School may certify graduates to take the bar examination.

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§ 6.12     Disclosure of Grades

Students may obtain their final grades through the Web for Students system on the Chicago-Kent web site (grades are not mailed to students). Grades are posted as they are received and approved by the administration. The Registrar is not permitted to disclose grades over the telephone to any person. Students must give written consent for disclosure of grades to an individual other than themselves.

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§ 6.13     Class Rank

Students who have completed at least one academic year at the Law School are ranked each semester according to their cumulative GPA. Classes are ranked by expected date of graduation. Each July, an official class rank is assigned to each graduate. The official class ranks for students who are not graduating are computed twice each academic year after the grades have been processed for the Fall and Spring semesters. The class rank is not affected by students who transfer to another law school or withdraw from the Law School after the semester is completed; the departed students will not be included in the next computation of class rank. Once class ranks are released to students, ranks will not be affected by grade changes submitted by instructors subsequent to that date.

Students who graduate in August and December are ranked with the succeeding May graduating class. Only Law School grades are used in calculating the GPAs of students in the joint J.D./M.B.A. program or other joint programs described in §§1.23 to 1.26. Grades earned in LL.M. courses prior to the student receiving the J.D. degree are included in the J.D. GPA for joint J.D./LL.M. students. However, J.D. students in joint J.D./LL.M. programs may only receive the grades listed in §6.1.

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§ 6.14     Dean's Honor List

Students who earn a GPA of at least 3.250 for the semester are placed on the Dean's Honor List. To be eligible for the Dean's Honor List, full-time Day Division students must have received credit for at least 12 hours (10 hours for graduating seniors in their last two semesters) for the semester, and part-time Day Division students and Evening Division students must have received credit for at least eight hours for the semester. First-year students are eligible for the Dean's Honor List for their first semester. In order to be eligible for the Dean's Honor List, students in the joint J.D./M.B.A. program or other joint programs described in §§ 1.23 to 1.26 must meet the minimum credit requirements described above considering their law courses only.

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§ 6.15     Transcripts

Students may request an official transcript of their Law School record be sent to another institution by submitting a Transcript Request form to the Registrar. A transcript will not be issued if the student's financial account with the University is delinquent. Official transcripts will not be issued to students. Unofficial transcripts are available to students and may be accessed through the Registrar's office home page.

Section 6-5(b) of the Chicago-Kent Code of Conduct, which appears in Section XIX of this Handbook, provides that whenever a student is convicted of violating the Code of Conduct, a notation to that effect shall be made on the student's transcript. However, if the Tribunal unanimously determines that the interests of justice so require, the Tribunal may suspend the entry of said notation on conditions it seems appropriate.

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§ 6.16  CALI Excellence for the Future Award

The CALI Excellence for the Future Award, sponsored by the Center for Computer-Assisted Legal Instruction, is given each semester to the student or students who receive the highest grade in each section of each course. An instructor may elect not to designate a CALI winner. A student who elects to take a course pass/fail is not eligible for the CALI Award for that course.

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SECTION VII. EXAMINATIONS

§ 7.1     In General

In most courses, the grade is based primarily on one written examination at the conclusion of the course. An instructor may require a written paper in lieu of, or in addition to, an examination. Some instructors give midterm examinations or other assignments, which may or may not be counted in the final grade. Courses designated as practice courses and seminars typically do not have an examination but require either simulated exercises or written assignments involving extensive legal research.

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§ 7.2     Exam Schedule and Conflicts

The examination schedule is published with the class schedule before registration each semester. All students must take their examinations at the scheduled time, except as provided herein and in §§7.3 and 7.4. If a student registers for two courses with examinations scheduled at the same time, one examination will be rescheduled for the same day at a different hour, or for Evening Division students, within 24 hours. If a final exam is to be rescheduled, a Final Exam Reschedule form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. In addition, the student must sign an Affirmation of Nondisclosure stating that he or she has not and will not communicate with anyone about any aspect of the examination.

A student will be deemed to have a conflict if he or she has two exams scheduled within 24 hours (e.g., exams at 8:30 a.m. and 6:00 p.m., or at 6:00 p.m. and 1:15 p.m. the following afternoon). A conflict does not exist if two exams are scheduled exactly 24 hours apart (e.g., exams at 8:30 a.m. and 8:30 a.m. the next morning).

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§ 7.3     Missing an Examination

Students are expected to take examinations when scheduled, even though ill or inconvenienced. However, for serious illness or other extraordinary or compelling reason beyond the control of the student, a student may be excused from taking the exam at its scheduled time. Day Division students will not be excused from an examination for a job-related reason.

A student must notify the Director of Student Services at the earliest possible time in advance of the exam, if the reason for missing the exam is known to the student in advance. When prior notice is not possible, the student must contact the Director of Student Services or the Assistant Dean for Academic Administration and Student Affairs as soon during or after the examination as possible to explain the failure to take the examination and, when permitted, to arrange for a makeup examination and/or an Incomplete. Failure to notify the Director of Student Services or the Assistant Dean before grades are submitted will result in the student receiving a failing grade.

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§ 7.4     Make-up Examinations

When a student is excused from an exam, the student ordinarily will take the examination the next time the course is given by the same instructor. However, if more than one academic year is expected to pass before the instructor offers the same course, the student will take the exam the next time the course is offered by any instructor. If an exam is to be taken more than one month after the scheduled time, an Incomplete Grade Agreement must be completed.

In the discretion of the instructor, an examination may be given within one month after the end of the final examination period, rather than the next time the exam is regularly given. The time of the examination will be arranged by the instructor. A make-up examination may not be given more than one month after the last day of the final examination period. Students who will have graduated before the next time the exam is expected to be given by the instructor will take the exam no later than one month after the end of the exam period, at a time arranged by the instructor. If a student requests an examination schedule change for religious reasons, the examination will be scheduled on the next day which does not violate the student's religious beliefs, including Sunday.

When a final exam is to be rescheduled, a Final Exam Reschedule form must be completed and approved by the Director of Student Services and the student must sign an Affirmation of Nondisclosure. When a paper or other required assignment is to be made up, the Incomplete Grade Agreement may allow the work to be completed within one year from the date the paper or assignment was originally due.

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§ 7.5     Student Conduct During Examinations

Student conduct during examinations is subject to the Chicago-Kent Code of Conduct, which is set forth in Section XIX of this Handbook.

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§ 7.6     Examination Procedures

Students must sit in alternate seats during examinations. At the beginning of the exam, the proctor will advise the students of the time at which the exam will end and will write the ending time on the blackboard. When time has expired, the proctor will announce that the exam is over and students must stop writing immediately and turn in their examinations. Failure to stop writing constitutes a violation of the Code of Conduct. Students are not permitted to leave their seats for any reason during the last ten minutes of an exam. When the proctor announces there are ten minutes left, students must remain seated until the proctor announces the exam is over. Special rules concerning computer exams will be announced each semester in the Record or otherwise distributed to students.

A student must not identify himself or herself by name, social security number, or any other designation or symbol anywhere on the examination questions or answer book or sheet; only the examination number assigned to the student should be used. A student should not disclose the examination number to the instructor, either directly or indirectly, until the instructor has submitted the final grades for the course. Failure to comply with these provisions may be a violation of the Code of Conduct, which appears in Section XIX of this Handbook (see §2-1(e) of the Code).

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§ 7.7     Determination of Grades

Grades are to be determined solely on the basis of the academic performance of each student according to criteria determined by the course instructor that are consistent with Law School, University, Association of American Law Schools, and American Bar Association policies. It is permissible for an instructor to consider class participation and attendance in determining a student's final grade. During the first week of class, the instructor will advise the students of the factors that will be considered in determining the final grade (e.g., examinations, papers, class participation, attendance, and other appropriate factors). Thereafter, the instructor may inform the students of additions to or changes in the factors with respect to attendance and participation that will be considered in determining the final grade. Such changes will have prospective application only. The evaluation and grading of academic performance are subject to the professional judgment of each instructor. Considerable personal discretion is required in these judgments. A justifiable margin of difference can exist between the evaluation of the same academic performance made by two or more professional persons.

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§ 7.8     Review of Examinations and Other Assignments

A faculty member must review an examination or other written assignments with a student, regardless of the grade received, provided the student has complied with reasonable preconditions, such as attending an examination review session or making an appointment within a specified time. A faculty member is not, however, expected to debate the grading.

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§ 7.9     Appeal of Grade

A student may appeal a grade by submitting a petition to the faculty alleging that the grade received was the result of capricious grading. Capricious grading constitutes either (1) assignment of a grade on the basis of factors substantially different from those previously announced, or (2) assignment of a grade to the petitioning student by resort to more exacting or demanding criteria than were applied to other students in that course. The judgment of an instructor in assessing the quality of a student's work is not appealable on other grounds. Refer to §7.7.

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SECTION VIII. GRADE POINT AVERAGE REQUIREMENTS

§ 8.1     Definitions

The First Academic Semester for students in the full-time Day Division, including transfer students admitted with fewer than six hours of credit, ends upon completion of the first semester. The First Academic Semester for students in either the part-time Day Division or the Evening Division ends upon completion of the second semester. A part-time Day Division student or an Evening Division student who transfers to the full-time Day Division at the end of the student's first semester will be considered a Day Division student for purposes of this section.

An Advanced Semester is any semester in which a student is enrolled for at least six credit hours after completion of the First Academic Semester. A Summer session is not considered an Advanced Semester.

Different rules apply to students who began their legal studies prior to 1997. Those students should see the Assistant Dean for Academic Administration and Student Affairs for the rules applicable to them.

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§ 8.2     (Reserved)

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§ 8.3     GPA Requirements

A student must attain a cumulative GPA of at least 2.300 for the First Academic Semester and at the end of each Advanced Semester to remain in good academic standing. In computing a student's cumulative GPA, a grade received to replace an Incomplete grade is counted in the cumulative GPA in the semester in which the Incomplete was given.

Different rules apply to students who began their legal studies prior to 1999. Those students should see the Assistant Dean for Academic Administration and Student Affairs for the rules applicable to them.

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§ 8.4     Dismissal From the Law School

A student whose cumulative GPA falls below 1.700 at the end of the First Academic Semester will be dismissed from the Law School for academic reasons. Students who fail the same required course twice shall not be permitted to reregister for that course and shall be dismissed from the Law School.

Different rules apply to students who began their legal studies prior to 1999. Those students should see the Assistant Dean for Academic Administration and Student Affairs for the rules applicable to them.

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§ 8.5     Academic Probation

    (a) A student who began the study of law prior to 1997 will be placed on academic probation if his/her cumulative GPA is at least 1.700 but below 2.100 at the end of the First Academic Year. A student who began the study of law in 1997 or 1998 will be placed on academic probation if his/her GPA is at least 1.550 but below 2.100 the end of the First Academic Semester. A student who began the study of law in 1999 or later will be placed on academic probation if his/her GPA is at least 1.700 but below 2.300 at the end of the First Academic Semester.

        If the cumulative GPA of a student who began the study of law prior to 1999 falls below 2.100 at the end of any Advanced Semester, the student will be placed on academic probation. If the cumulative GPA of a student who began the study of law in 1999 or later falls below 2.300 at the end of any Advanced Semester, the student will be placed on academic probation. A student on academic probation will be entitled to one or more semesters of academic probation as provided in the following subsections.

    (b) Except as provided in §8.5(f), a student who began the study of law prior to 1999 is permitted only one probationary semester within which to attain a cumulative GPA of at least 2.100. If the student attains that cumulative GPA, the student regains good academic standing at the end of the probationary semester. If a student regains good academic standing and his/her cumulative GPA later falls below 2.100, the student will be permanently dismissed from the law school without further probation.

        Except as provided in §8.5(f), a student who began the study of law in 1999 or later is permitted only one probationary semester within which to attain a cumulative GPA of at least 2.300. If the student attains that cumulative GPA, the student regains good academic standing at the end of the probationary semester. If a student regains good academic standing and his/her cumulative GPA later falls below 2.300, the student will be permanently dismissed from the Law School without further probation.

    (c) The probationary semester is the first academic semester after the effective date the student is placed on probation, which is the last day of the semester in which the GPA fell below the minimum GPA, regardless of the date of receipt of such grades. A Summer session may not serve as the probationary semester.

    (d) A student may withdraw from the law school prior to the probationary semester. A student may withdraw during the probationary semester only with the approval of the Director of Student Services. In the event of withdrawal prior to or during the probationary semester, the student must re-enroll in the law school for the probationary semester the next academic semester, unless the student receives permission of the Director of Student Services to further postpone the probationary semester. Failure to enroll in either the first or second academic semester after the effective date the student is placed on academic probation, without permission of the Director of Student Services, will result in dismissal from the law school.

    (e) A student's class schedule for the probationary semester must be approved by the Director of the Academic Support Program; once approved, changes in the schedule require permission of the Director of the Academic Support Program.

    (f) A student who who began the study of law prior to 1999 and who fails to achieve a cumulative GPA of at least 2.100 at the end of the probationary semester will be dismissed permanently from the law school unless the student earned a GPA of 2.500 or higher in the probationary semester. A student who earns a GPA of at least 2.500 in the probationary semester is entitled to a second probationary semester within which to achieve a cumulative GPA of at least 2.100. A student who fails to achieve a cumulative GPA of at least 2.100 at the end of the second probationary semester will be dismissed permanently from the law school regardless of the GPA earned in the second probationary semester.

        A student who began the study of law in 1999 or later and who fails to achieve a cumulative GPA of at least 2.300 at the end of the probationary semester will be dismissed permanently from the Law School unless the student earned a GPA of 2.600 or higher in the probationary semester. A student who earns a GPA of at least 2.600 in the probationary semester is entitled to a second probationary semester within which to achieve a cumulative GPA of at least 2.300. A student who fails to achieve a cumulative GPA of at least 2.300 at the end of the second probationary semester will be dismissed permanently from the Law School regardless of the GPA earned in the second probationary semester.

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§ 8.6     Effect of Summer Session Grades on the Probationary Semester

All students who have not been notified that they have been dismissed may enroll in the Summer session. The Summer session will not be considered a student's probationary semester.

If a student is notified that her or she has been dismissed as of the previous Spring semester, the student must immediately withdraw from the Summer session; the tuition for the Summer session will be refunded. This provision applies regardless of when the student is notified of the dismissal, even if the such notification is received after the Summer session has concluded. If the student has been dismissed as of the prior Spring semester, grades received during the Summer session are void and will not count for any purpose.

If a student will be on academic probation in the Fall semester, the student may enroll in the Summer session. The Summer session will not be considered the student's probationary semester. The grades earned during the Summer session will be averaged together with the grades earned during the fall probationary semester to determine if the student has met the 2.100 requirement of  §8.5(b) (for students who began prior to 1999) or the 2.300 requirement of §8.5(b) (for students who began in 1999 or later), but will not be averaged to determine if the student has met the 2.500 requirement of §8.5(b) (for students who began prior to 1999) or the 2.600 requirement of §8.5(b) (for students who began in 1999 or later).

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§ 8.7     Applications for Readmission

Students dismissed for failing to satisfy the minimum GPA requirements may apply for readmission to the law school as a new student after three years from the date of dismissal. Students admitted under this procedure will not receive credit for any course work previously completed and will have to complete all courses required for new students at the time of readmission. In considering applications for readmission, the applicant's prior dismissal will be considered as a negative factor. In order to be admitted under this procedure, the applicant must provide evidence to the Admissions Committee that he/she possesses the requisite ability and that the applicant's prior dismissal does not indicate a lack of capacity to complete the course of study.

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§ 8.8     Repeated Courses

A student who receives the grade of E or WE in a required course must retake the course at the earliest opportunity. A student who receives the grade of E or WE in an elective course may, but is not required to, register for the course in a subsequent semester and receive credit by successfully passing the course on repeat. If a student repeats a course in which an E or WE was received, full tuition must be paid for the course the second time and the student's cumulative GPA will include both the E or WE grade and the grade received on repeat. A student may not repeat a course in which the grade of D- or higher was received.

In addition to the standards of the Law School relating to academic probation, students who fail the same required course twice shall not be permitted to reregister for that course and shall be dismissed from the Law School.

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SECTION IX. CLASS ATTENDANCE

§ 9.1     Class Attendance

Each student is expected to attend all classes regularly and punctually, to be prepared, to participate in the discussion, and to remain throughout the session. An instructor may notify the class of reasonable attendance requirements and may deduct credit or award the grade of WP or Incomplete if a student fails to meet the requirements.

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§ 9.2     Failure of an Instructor to Appear in Class

If an instructor does not appear in class within 15 minutes after the class is scheduled to begin and has not given notice that he or she will be late, the students may presume the class has been canceled.

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§ 9.3     Tape Recording Class Sessions

Classes may be tape recorded only if the instructor and all students present consent.

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§ 9.4    Scheduling of Make-up Classes

No instructor shall schedule a make-up class during the period designated "Read Period," except on the first day of that period. Optional review sessions are permitted during the remainder of the period. Faculty should make every effort to schedule make-up classes during the regular semester, considering the feasibility of scheduling them during the two periods of time each week during which no regular classes are scheduled.

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SECTION X. FACULTY MEETINGS AND COMMITTEES

 § 10.1     Schedule of Faculty Meetings

At the beginning of each semester, the Dean announces the schedule of faculty meetings for the semester. Meetings are generally held each month classes are in session during the Fall and Spring semesters.

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§ 10.2     Student Representation

The Student Bar Association president is invited to attend faculty meetings and may participate in most matters, except those involving individual students or faculty members. The SBA president may vote on all matters in which he or she may participate. Faculty meetings are closed to the general student body.

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§ 10.3     Publication of Minutes of Faculty Meetings

Minutes of faculty meetings (with deletion of matters relating to individual students) will be made available to the SBA president, who may make them available to the student body in an appropriate manner.

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§ 10.4     Student Representation on Faculty Committees

The Dean will designate which faculty committees shall have student representation and how the student representatives shall be selected.

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§ 10.5     Dean's Advisory Council

The Dean invites designated officers and representatives of the Student Bar Association and/or other students to be members of the Dean's Advisory Council, which meets periodically with the Dean or the Assistant Dean for Academic Administration and Student Affairs to discuss issues concerning the law school.

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SECTION XI. CURRICULAR MATTERS

§ 11.1     Required Courses and Course Descriptions

The courses required for the J.D. degree are listed in §1.2. Descriptions of courses are published in printed form and on the Chicago-Kent web site. Descriptions of new courses added since the last print publication of course descriptions, or courses for which the description has changed, are provided in the Registration Bulletin published each semester.

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§ 11.2     Recommended Courses for Upper-Level Students

Courses with an asterisk (*) cover material that is likely to be tested on many states' bar examinations, including that of Illinois. Other subject areas may also be tested; you should review the Bar Exam Information section of each semester's Registration Bulletin – or, if you plan to take another state's bar examination, contact the bar examiners in that state – before deciding which of these and other courses to take.

I. The faculty believes that every student should take:

A. *Business Organizations (4 hours)
B. *Evidence (3 hours)
C. Personal Income Tax (3 hours)
D. *Remedies (3 hours)

II. The faculty believes that every student should take at least 15 hours from the following list of courses, with most courses taken from subsection A and at least one course taken from subsection B. Courses not included in this list should not be thought of as less challenging or unimportant. They may have been left off because they cover advanced or very specialized material, or because they focus on non-traditional legal materials. Students may take some of those courses with their remaining electives.

For those students whose grade point average is in the lower third of the class after they complete their first year of law school (two semesters for full-time Day Division students and three semesters for part-time Day Division students and for Evening Division students), we recommend in the strongest terms possible that they take at least 20 hours (rather than 15) from the following list, with a heavy emphasis on courses that cover subject matter that may be tested on the Bar Exam.

A. Courses in major areas of law:

1. Administrative Law (3 hours).
2. Civil Litigation: one of the following: Appellate Courts and Procedure (3 hours), Civil Procedure 2 (3 hours), Complex Litigation (3 hours), Federal Courts (3 hours), *Illinois Civil Procedure (2 hours).
3. Commercial Law: one or two of the following: *Secured Transactions (3 hours), *Payment Systems (3 hours), *Survey (4 hours).
4. *Conflict of Laws (3 hours)
5. *Constitutional Law: First Amendment (3 hours).
6. Criminal Procedure: *The Adjudicative Process (3 hours), or *The Investigative Process (3 hours).
7. *Estates and Trusts (4 hours).
8. *Family Law (3 hours).
9. International Law (3 hours) or Comparative Law (3 hours).
10. *Products Liability (2 hours).

B. Courses focusing on statutory analysis and/or administrative agencies:

1. Antitrust (3 hours).
2. Bankruptcy (3 hours).
3. Copyright Law (3 hours) or Patent Law (3 hours).
4. Employee Benefits Law (2 or 3 hours).
5. Employment Discrimination (3 hours).
6. Environmental Law & Policy (3 hours).
7. Labor Law (4 hours).
8. Legislation (3 hours).
9. Securities Regulation (3 hours).
10. Taxation of Business Enterprises (4 hours).

III. The faculty believes that every student should take at least one skills or one clinical course from the following list of such courses. Beginning in February 1998, the Illinois Bar Examination began using the Multistate Performance Test to test six fundamental lawyering skills: problem, solving, legal analysis and reasoning, factual analysis, communication, organization and management of a legal task, and recognizing and resolving ethical dilemmas. Each of the courses listed below teaches some of the above-listed skills. You should review the Bar Exam Information section of each semester's Registration Bulletin – or, if you plan to take another state's bar examination, contact the bar examiners in that state – before deciding which of these courses to take.

A. Skills courses:

1. Business Entity Formation (3 hours).
2. Business Entity Transactions (3 hours).
3. Employment Litigation (3 hours) (for students in the Labor and Employment Law Certificate Program only).
4. Pretrial Litigation (3 hours) (for students in the LADR Program only).
5. Trial Advocacy (3 hours).

B. Clinical courses:

1. In-House Clinic (3 or 4 hours):

a. Criminal Defense (3 or 4 hours).
b. Employment/General Litigation (3 or 4 hours).
c. Family Law (3 or 4 hours).
d. Health & Disability Law (3 or 4 hours).
e. Intellectual Property-Patents (3 hours).
f. Low Income Taxpayer (3 or 4 hours).
g. Mediation and Other ADR Procedures (3 or 4 hours).

2. Judicial Externship (4 hours).
3. Legal Externship (4 hours).
4. Labor and Employment Externship (4 hours) (for students in the Labor and Employment Law Certificate Program only).

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§ 11.3     Course Prerequisites

A student must have completed the prerequisite(s) indicated below before taking the courses. Other prerequisites may be published in the Registration Bulletin. A student who registers for a course without the necessary prerequisite will be removed from the course regardless of when the noncompliance is discovered. A student seeking to have a prerequisite waived should complete a Waiver of Prerequisite form and have it approved by the instructor and the Assistant Dean for Academic Administration and Student Affairs prior to registration.

Courses listed as "recommended" are helpful but not required. Course names following the underlined course are prerequisites unless otherwise indicated.

Acquisitions & Takeovers - Business Organizations

Administrative Law - Constitutional Law

Advanced Externship - third year standing; priority is given to students with one semester of In-House Clinic

Advanced Property: Real Estate Transactions - Property

Advanced Tax Transactions - Personal Income Tax

Alternative Dispute Resolution - 40 credit hours completed; not available if you have taken either Mediation or Negotiations

Banking Law - recommended: Estates and Trusts; Business Organizations

Bankruptcy - recommended: Secured Transactions

Burdens of Proof - Evidence

Business Entity Formation - Business Organizations

Business Insolvency - Bankruptcy; recommended: Commercial Law 1

Business Planning - Personal Income Tax, Business Organizations, and Taxation of Business Entities

Civil Rights/Liberties Section 1983 seminar - Constitutional Law

Commodities Regulation - recommended: Administrative Law and Securities Regulation

Complex Litigation - Civil Procedure

Constitutional Torts/Section 1983 - Constitutional Law

Construction Law - Property

Corporate Finance - Business Organizations; recommended: Accounting for Lawyers and Securities Regulation

Dynamics of Corporation Control - Business Organizations

Employee Benefits Law - Personal Income Tax completed or being taken concurrently

Employment Discrimination - recommended: Constitutional Law

Employment Litigation - either Employment Discrimination or Employment Relationships

Energy seminar - Environmental Law and Policy 1, Energy Law or work experience in an energy-related field 

Environmental Law and Policy 1 - Property

Environmental Law seminars - Environmental Law & Policy 2

Environmental Law and Policy 2 - Environmental Law and Policy 1

Estate Planning - Estates and Trusts, Personal Income Tax, and Gift & Estate Tax completed or being taken concurrently

Estates and Trusts - Property

Federal Courts - Civil Procedure and Constitutional Law

First Amendment - Constitutional Law completed or being taken concurrently

First Amendment Theory - Constitutional Law completed or being taken concurrently

Futures Regulation - recommended: Administrative Law and Securities Regulation
 
Forensic Sciences - Evidence

Gender and the Law - Constitutional Law

Gift & Estate Tax - Personal Income Tax completed or being taken concurrently; recommended: Estates and Trusts

Hazardous Waste and Nuclear Power Issues - Environmental Law 1

In-House Clinical Tax Program - Personal Income Tax and permission of Law Offices

International Criminal Law - International Law

International Environmental Law - Environmental Law & Policy 2

Interviewing & Counseling - Rule 711 License

Judicial Externship - 3.2 GPA; acceptance by a Federal judge or magistrate and written permission of Prof. Vivien Gross

Land Use - Property
 
Legal Rights of Children - recommended: Family Law

Medical Malpractice - recommended: Civil Procedure and Evidence

Mediation - 40 hours completed; not available if you've had ADR.
 
Negotiations - 40 hours completed; recommended: Evidence, Professional Responsibility, Civil Procedure, Commercial Law 1, and Labor Law; not available if you've taken Alternative Dispute Resolution

Patent Litigation seminar - Patent Law
 
Patent Office Practice - Patent Law

Products Liability - recommended: Evidence and Commercial Law 1

Public Sector Employment - recommended preparation: Labor Law

Remedies - Property and Civil Procedure; recommended: Evidence

School Law - recommended: Constitutional Law

Scientific Analysis of Environmental Problems - Environmental Law 1
 
Section 1983 seminar - Constitutional Law

Securities Regulations - Business Organizations

State and Local Government Law - recommended: Constitutional Law

Tax Procedure - Personal Income Tax

Taxation of Business Entities - Personal Income Tax; recommended: Accounting for Lawyers; Business Organizations

Tax Planning for International Business - Personal Income Tax

Trial Advocacy 1 - Evidence; Civil Procedure; recommended: Criminal Procedure: The Investigatory Process and Criminal Procedure: The Adjudicatory Process

Trial Advocacy 2 - Trial Advocacy 1

Urban Environmental Issues - Environmental Law & Policy 2

Urban Environmental Public Interest Practicum - Environmental Law and Policy 1 and 2 and membership in the Environmental and Energy Law Program.

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SECTION XII. TUITION AND FEES

§ 12.1     Tuition

Tuition information is available by clicking here.

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§ 12.2     U-Pass Fee

Full-time Day Division students are assessed a U-Pass fee each semester. The current amount of the fee is available by clicking here. The U-Pass is a discount fare card allowing unlimited rides on all Chicago Transit Authority buses and trains. Due to restrictions imposed by the CTA, the program is not currently available to Part-time Day Division students or Evening Division students.

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§ 12.3     Student Activities Fee

A student activities fee, as well as a supplemental loan repayment assistance program fee, are charged each semester. The student activities fee supports activities of the Student Bar Association and official student organizations. The current amounts of the fees are available by clicking here.

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§ 12.4     Student Insurance

All students registered for at least 12 hours, regardless of their Division, including Evening students registered for 12 hours, are automatically billed in the fall semester for student health insurance for the academic year. Insurance coverage may be waived by students who have comparable insurance coverage by filing a waiver form with the IIT Counseling and Health Services Office, Main Campus, Farr Hall, room 103, by a specified date. If you intend to waive the student insurance coverage, please read the waiver instructions on the insurance brochure carefully. If the waiver is not received by the Counseling and Health Services Office by the date specified, IIT will pay the premium for your insurance and you will be billed for it.

Students registered for fewer than 12 hours may acquire the IIT health insurance, if desired. All students may elect more comprehensive insurance coverage which is available for a higher premium. Brochures explaining the insurance coverage and waiver procedures are available in the Registrar's office.

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§ 12.5     Change of Program

There is no fee to process program changes. However, tuition is charged for dropped courses according to the tuition refund policy in §12.10.

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§ 12.6     Course Materials

Course materials, including textbooks and photocopied materials, are sold through the Downtown Campus Bookstore on the Concourse Level.

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§ 12.7     Payment of Charges

Tuition and fees are payable in full at the time specified in the Registration Bulletin unless the student enrolls in America's Tuition Plan (ATP). All students enrolled for at least six credit hours per semester are eligible to participate in ATP. Students in ATP must meet the payment schedule in order to maintain their registration. A 1% per month late fee will be charged on past due amounts; see §12.8. Information about ATP is available in the Bursar's Office, room 290.

Generally, past-due tuition and fees must be paid in full before a student may register. However, a student may submit a Petition to Register with an Unpaid Balance to Dean Rupcich, Dean of Administration, Finance, & CLE, in Suite 265. If the petition is granted, the student may register with an unpaid tuition balance.

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§ 12.8     Financial Delinquency

Any student who fails to meet the required payments as provided in §12.7 will be charged a late penalty. This penalty will be 1% per month of the amount due on the payment due date. The 1% payment penalty will be charged each month until the amount due is paid in full.

Students with delinquent accounts are subject to suspension and exclusion from classes after being notified by the Bursar. These students may not be permitted to take final examinations, receive course credits or transcripts, register for a subsequent semester, receive a degree or be certified to the bar examiners, unless a petition is approved by Dean Rupcich; see §12.7.

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§ 12.9     Dishonored Checks

A dishonored check not redeemed within three days after notice may result in exclusion from classes. A $25 fee is charged for each dishonored check.

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§ 12.10     Tuition Refund Policy

Tuition is charged for all courses for which a student is registered unless the student officially drops the course in accordance with §3.10(a). There is no tuition penalty if a student drops a course during the first two weeks of classes in the Fall or Spring semester. There will be no tuition refund, however, if a student drops a course after the second week of classes in the Fall or Spring semester. For the Summer session, tuition will be refunded only if a student drops a course during the first week of the term.

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§ 12.11     Tuition Refund Policy: Special Situations

No tuition will be charged, and a full refund will be made of any amounts paid, upon application supported by proof, as necessary, under the following circumstances: (1) a course in which the student is registered is cancelled; (2) death or serious injury causing incapacity occurs to the student before the end of the twelfth week of class (sixth week of class in a Summer session); or (3) a student is dropped from courses because he or she has been dismissed from the Law School for failure to meet academic requirements during the immediately preceding semester of instruction. Under other exceptional circumstances, such as withdrawal for voluntary military service, serious illness, or action by the University, consideration may be given to a prorated refund or credit for unused tuition upon written request to the Registrar.

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SECTION XIII. FINANCIAL AID AND SCHOLARHIPS

Additional information about financial aid is available from the Office of Financial Aid in Suite 230 and the Office of Financial Aid's home page, at http://www.kentlaw.edu/depts/finaid. Additional information about scholarship programs is available from the Office of Admissions in Suite 230.

§ 13.1      Full-time, Half-time Status for Financial Aid and Deferment Purposes

For financial aid purposes, during the fall and spring semesters, a full-time student is defined as a student enrolled in at least 12 credit hours, a half-time student is enrolled in six to 11 hours, and a part-time student is enrolled in fewer than six hours. During the summer session, a student must be enrolled in at least six credit hours to obtain Federal loans. Students must be enrolled for at least six hours to retain half-time status to maintain deferrals on their loans disbursed on or after January 1, 1987. Contact your lender for more specific information about the requirements for deferment.

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§ 13.2     Scholarships

The law school provides a range of scholarships to reward academic performance and to help lessen financial need. A summary of the types of available awards is available online by clicking here. Questions about scholarship awards should be directed to Karla Davis, Director of Admissions, at kdavis1@kentlaw.edu.

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§ 13.3     Scholarship Policies

The law school's policies on the award and retention of scholarships are available by clicking here. Questions about scholarship awards should be directed to Karla Davis, Director of Admissions, at kdavis1@kentlaw.edu.

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§ 13.4      Outside Scholarships

Students seeking scholarships offered outside of Chicago-Kent College of Law should consult the Record for notices of scholarships and writing contests awarded by outside organizations.

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§ 13.5     Student Loans

Both federally-funded and privately-funded loan programs are available for law students. Information on loan programs, the requirements for applying for loans, and the law school's policies with respect to financial aid is available by clicking here.

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§ 13.6     Sandra Baez Emergency Loan Fund

Students may borrow up to $300 for 60 days without interest from the Sandra Baez Emergency Loan Fund The fund is administered by the Dean of Administration and Finance in Suite 265.

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§ 13.7      Summer Session Loans

Students who plan to take summer courses at Chicago-Kent or at another law school in the United States or Overseas are eligible to apply for either the federal or private loans. For information on applying for summer session loans, click here.

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§ 13.8      Visiting Another Law School or Visiting Overseas

Information about financial aid for students who will visit at another law school (including an overseas program) during the academic year is available by clicking here.

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§ 13.9 Veterans

Information about educational benefits for veterans is available by clicking here.

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§ 13.10  Deferments

To postpone the payments on your outstanding student loans, you must request an in-school deferment from your loan servicer. To request an in-school deferment you must contact your servicer to obtain an in-school deferment form. Complete the student section of the form and give the form to the Registrar's Office. The Registrar’s Office will complete a pre-enrollment verification with your servicer(s). Please be aware that your in-school deferment will not start until classes begin.

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SECTION XIV. GENERAL INFORMATION

§ 14.1     Official Notices: Law School Record

Official notices are printed in the Record, an online newsletter produced each week during the academic year when classes are in session. The Record is posted on the Chicago-Kent web site each Friday afternoon for the following week. All notices published in the Record are deemed to have been communicated to all students; the Record serves as "constructive notice."

Faculty, staff, and student organizations may have notices or announcements published in the Record by e-mailing record@kentlaw.edu by Thursday at noon for inclusion in the following week's edition.

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§ 14.2     Bulletin Boards and Posting of Notices

Selected announcements and notices are posted on the Law School bulletin boards located outside the Registrar's office on the east and west walls of the second floor. Class cancellation notices are posted on the board to the left of the first-floor stairs opposite the front doors of the building. Students should check these bulletin boards frequently for announcements such as course assignments, class cancellations, and make-up classes. Career Services bulletin boards are located in the west corridor of the third floor.

Student organization and general student bulletin boards are located on the Concourse level and in the third floor of the Cafeteria. Notices and literature are not permitted any place other than these bulletin boards. Specifically, notices may not be posted on any walls or glass, on doors or lockers, or in restrooms, elevators, or the Library. Stacked materials must be placed in or near the display racks on the Concourse level, not stacked along the walls of the Concourse. Commercial solicitation is not permitted in the Law School building. All unauthorized postings and materials will be removed and discarded.

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§ 14.3     Rule 711 Licenses

A student who has successfully completed 53 credit hours (60% of the credit hours required for graduation) may obtain an Illinois Supreme Court Rule 711 License to practice law under the terms and conditions set forth in the Rule. Students may not apply for the license until they have received grades in courses totaling 53 credit hours; it is no longer permissible to apply after taking final exams (but before grades have been received) in courses totaling 53 credit hours.

Application forms are available through the Registrar's office home page. Students should print the appropriate form out, complete the form, and return it to the Registrar's office with the supervising attorney's signature and the required photograph of the student. After receipt of the form, the Dean certifies the status of the student and the application is sent to the Administrative Office of the Illinois Courts, which issues the license and mails it to the student.

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§ 14.4     Privacy Rights and Access to Educational Records

Chicago-Kent College of Law respects the rights of privacy of its students and acknowledges the responsibility to maintain confidentiality of personally identifiable educational records.  The law school will comply with The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), which affords students certain rights with respect to their education records. They are:

    (1) The right to inspect and review the student's education records within 45 days of the day the University received a request for access. Students should submit to the Registrar a written request that identifies the records they wish to inspect. The Registrar will make arrangements for access and notify the student when the records may be inspected. If the records are not maintained by the Registrar, the Registrar will advise the student of the correct official to whom the request should be addressed.

    (2) The right to request the amendment of the student's education records that the student believes are inaccurate or misleading. Students may ask the law school to amend a record that they believe is inaccurate or misleading. They should write the Assistant Dean for Academic Administration and Student Affairs and identify the part of the record they want changed, and specify why it is inaccurate or misleading. If the Assistant Dean deteremines not to amend the record as requested by the student, he or she will notify the student of the decision and advise the student of his or her right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the student when notified of the right to a hearing.

    (3) The law school  has adopted a policy of not disclosing personally identifiable information, other than the directory information described in §14.5, from the educational records of a student without his or her prior written consent, except in the following instances permitted under FERPA: (1) To school officials, including teachers, within the educational institution who have a legitimate educational interest. A school official is a person employed by the University in an administrative, supervisory, academic or research, or support staff position (including law enforcement unit personnel and health staff); a person or company with whom the University has contracted (such as an attorney, auditor, or collection agent); or a student serving on an official committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance committee, or assisting another school official in performing his or her tasks. (2) To officials of another school in which the student seeks or intends to enroll, provided that a documented attempt will be made to notify the student of intended disclosure, prior to submission of such information. (3) To certain authorized representatives of the United States and state agencies who require such information to carry out lawful functions. (4) In connection with the student's application for, or receipt of, financial aid. (5) To organizations conducting studies for, or on behalf of, educational agencies or institutions, if these studies are conducted in a manner that will not permit the personal identification of students and if the information will be destroyed when no longer needed for the purpose for which it is conducted. (6) To accrediting organizations in order to carry out their accrediting functions. (7) To comply with a judicial order or lawfully issued subpoena. (8) To appropriate parties in health or safety emergencies. (9) To parents of dependent Chicago-Kent students, as defined in Section 152 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986.

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§ 14.5     Directory Information

Chicago-Kent reserves the right to release at its own discretion the following directory information about enrolled students: name of student; date and place of birth; local address, phone number, and e-mail address; home address and phone number; enrollment status and dates of attendance at Chicago-Kent; positions held, place of employment, and extension number of students employed by Chicago-Kent; memberships in officially recognized campus organizations, including offices held in such organizations; degrees earned and special awards and recognition given; photograph of student; and all information requested by the Illinois Board of Admissions to the Bar and bar exam officials of other states for all students and former students. Such directory information available from educational records kept by Chicago-Kent may also be released concerning former students for the time during which they were registered as students at Chicago-Kent.

The following directory information is published in a Student Directory maintained on a secure section of the Chicago-Kent web site available only to members of the Chicago-Kent community: name of student; local address and phone number; and photograph.

If a student does not wish his or her local address, phone number, and/or photograph published on the Chicago-Kent web site or otherwise released, the student must submit a Privacy Form, available on the Web for Students site (accessed through the Webmail system). If a student does not wish other types of directory information released, the student must file a written request with the Registrar specifying the types of information the students wishes to be withheld. Chicago-Kent reserves the right to release directory information to school officials who have a legitimate educational interest (see §14.4) despite a student's request to withhold the information.

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§ 14.6     Reservation of Rooms and Scheduling of Events

The Office of Administration and Finance (Suite 265) is responsible for scheduling rooms for events held in the Law School building. Any group or individual, including an instructor, who wishes to use a room for any purpose other than a regularly scheduled class (e.g., a speaker, make-up class, or committee or organization meeting) must submit a room request using the online room reservation form linked to the Office of Administration and Finance Record page. An e-mail confirmation will be sent to the person submitting the request within 24 business hours from receipt of the properly completed form.

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§ 14.7     Use of Facilities

An organization not associated with the Law School that wishes to use Law School facilities must submit a letter at least two weeks in advance to the Office of Administration and Finance, Suite 265. Organizations not associated with the Law School will be charged room rental fees and other applicable charges.

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§ 14.8     Lost and Found

Students should not leave personal belongings unattended in classrooms, offices, lounges, washrooms, the Library, or any other area of the Law School building. Found items should be taken to the front lobby reception desk, where a lost and found service is maintained.

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§ 14.9     Lockers

Lockers assignments are arranged by the Registrar. Students retain their assigned locker throughout their years at Chicago-Kent.

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§ 14.10     Bookstore

The Downtown Campus Bookstore is located on the Concourse level (312/906-5605). The bookstore carries an extensive line of casebooks, study aids, supplies, gifts, greeting cards, and clothing. The bookstore is open Monday through Friday; hours are posted. For information on ordering course materials online, go to the Bookstore link on the main Student Portal page on the Law School's web site.

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§ 14.11     ID Cards

Photo ID cards are issued by the Registrar's office. All Chicago-Kent students must obtain an ID card at the beginning of their first semester.

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§ 14.12     Parking

Special parking rates are available to students in nearby parking lots. Students must pick up a parking sticker from the Bookstore to obtain the Chicago-Kent rate. The parking lots provide valet parking for disabled patrons.

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§ 14.13     IIT Main Campus Facilities

Chicago-Kent students are welcome to use the gym, swimming pool, bowling alley, and other facilities on IIT's Main Campus. For information regarding the hours and availability of facilities, contact the Student and Academic Affairs office on the main campus at 567-3305 (extension 73305 from phones within the law school).

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§ 14.14     Shuttle Bus Service to Main Campus

IIT provides free bus service between the Law School and the IIT Main Campus. The schedule is available online through the Office of Administration and Finance Record page. Print copies are available at the front lobby reception desk. The bus stops at the following locations: 33rd and Federal, 31st and Federal, 26th and Princeton, 13th and Canal, Canal and Adams, Madison and Clinton, and Adams and Jefferson (the Law School). Not all buses make all stops. A valid Chicago-Kent ID card must be presented to the driver on request.

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§ 14.15     Personal Mail

Students may not use the Law School address for personal mail. Such mail will be returned to the Post Office as undeliverable.

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§ 14.16     School Closing Due to Inclement Weather

Announcements concerning closing of the Law School due to inclement weather will be broadcast by WGN Radio (AM 720), WBBM Radio (AM 780), ZONE Radio (FM 94.7), and on the following Chicago TV stations: Channel 2 (CBS), Channel 5 (NBC), Channel 7 (ABC), Channel 9 (WGN), and Channel 32 (FOX). You may also call 312/222-SNOW, or go to http://www.emergencyclosings.com (check under IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law).

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§ 14.17     Alcoholic Beverages

Alcoholic beverages may not be sold on Law School property. Alcoholic beverages may be served on Law School property provided prior permission is obtained. To secure permission, a Request to Serve Alcohol form must be submitted to the Office of Administration and Finance (Suite 265) at least two weeks prior to the event at which alcoholic beverages are to be served.

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§ 14.18     Smoking Policy

Smoking is not permitted in the Law School building.

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§ 14.19     Student Complaints

Chicago-Kent College of Law is accredited by the American Bar Association and is subject to the ABA’s Standards for Approval of Law Schools, available at http://www.americanbar.org/groups/legal_education/resources/standards.html. Listed below are the procedures that a student should use if the student believes there is a significant problem that directly implicates the Law School’s program of legal education and its compliance with the ABA Standards.

1. The student should submit the complaint by email, postal mail, personal delivery, or fax to the Dean or to the Assistant Dean for Academic Administration and Student Affairs.

2. The complaint should describe in detail the grounds for the complaint and how the matter implicates the Law School’s program of legal education and/or its compliance with one or more ABA Standard(s).

3. The complaint should include the name of, and contact information for, the complaining student so that a response can be made to the student.

4. The administrator to whom the complaint is submitted will acknowledge the complaint within three business days of receipt. Acknowledgment may be made by e-mail, postal mail, personal delivery, or fax.

5. Within two weeks of acknowledgment of the complaint, the administrator, or the administrator’s designee, shall respond to the substance of the complaint either by meeting with the complaining student or by written response. If the administrator determines that the complaint warrants corrective action or further investigation, the complaining student will be informed of the steps being taken to address or investigate the complaint. If further investigation is needed, the student will be informed of the results within two weeks after completion of the investigation.

6. Appeals regarding decisions on complaints may be taken to the Dean of the Law School or, if the Dean has decided the merits of the complaint, the Provost of the University. Any decision made on appeal by the Dean or the Provost shall be final.

7. A copy of the complaint and a summary of the process and resolution of the complaint shall be kept in the office of the Assistant Dean for Academic Administration and Student Affairs for a period of eight years from the date of final resolution of the complaint.

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§ 14.20     Escort Service

The security staff will escort students to their cars in the evening; information about this service is available at the registration desk in the front lobby.

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§ 14.21      Building and Library Hours

Building and Library hours are posted in the front lobby display case and are available online through the Office of Administration and Finance Record page. Print copies are available at the front lobby reception desk.

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SECTION XV. (Reserved)

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SECTION XVI. ANTI-DISCRIMINATION AND HARASSMENT POLICIES

§ 16.1     Law School Policy on Equality of Opportunity

As a member of the Association of American Law Schools and in conformity with its bylaws, the faculty of Chicago-Kent adopted the following policy: Chicago-Kent College of Law of the Illinois Institute of Technology provides equality of opportunity in legal education for all persons, including faculty and employees, with respect to hiring, continuation, promotion and tenure, applicants for admission, enrolled students, and alumni, without discrimination on the ground of race, color, religion, national origin, gender, age, disability, sexual orientation, or gender identity.

Any students, applicant or employee of Illinois Institute of Technology who believes that he or she has received inequitable treatment because of discrimination violating this policy should communicate, either in writing or in person, with the Director of Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action, 224 Perlstein Hall, 312.567.3134.

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§ 16.2     IIT Policy on Equality of Opportunity

It is the intention of Illinois Institute of Technology to act in accordance with all regulations of the federal, state, and local governments in respect to providing equality of opportunity in employment and in education, insofar as those regulations may pertain to IIT. IIT prohibits and will act to eliminate discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, gender, sexual orientation, age, disability or veteran status.

Any students, applicant or employee of Illinois Institute of Technology who believes that he or she has received inequitable treatment because of discrimination violating IIT’s stated policy of equal opportunity in employment and in education should communicate, either in writing or in person, with the Director of Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action, 224 Perlstein Hall, 312.567.3134.

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§ 16.3     IIT Policy on Sexual Harassment and Misconduct

Illinois Institute of Technology is committed to ensuring an environment for all members of the university community that is fair, humane, and respectful--an environment which supports and rewards student, faculty and staff performance on the basis of relevant considerations such as ability and effort. Behaviors that inappropriately assert sexuality as relevant to student, faculty or staff performance damage this environment.

Therefore, IIT will provide for its students, faculty and staff an educational and employment environment free of unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct or communications constituting sexual harassment as defined and otherwise prohibited by local, state and federal law.

The entire sexual harassment policy, including procedures for reporting violations, is available by clicking here.

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SECTION XVII. DOWNTOWN CAMPUS LIBRARY

§ 17.1     Library Hours

Monday - Thursday: 8:00 a.m. - 11:00 p.m.

Friday: 8:00 a.m. - 8:00 p.m.

Saturday: 9:00 a.m. - 8:00 p.m.

Sunday: 10:00 a.m. - 11:00 p.m.

Check the Record for hour changes during vacations, read periods, and final exams.

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§ 17.2     General Rules

Courteous behavior is expected of all library clients, including in the treatment of the materials and of other clients. Consideration of others in maintaining a quiet study environment, in reshelving materials, and in maintaining the integrity of the materials is basic. Drinks are allowed in the Library. Food is not permitted in the Library. No food or drinks are allowed in the computer labs.

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§ 17.3     Circulation Policies

To borrow a book from the Library, one must have a valid Chicago-Kent Law Library identification card with a current sticker. Most of the collection does not circulate and must be used within the library, including all primary law (reporters, statues, administrative materials, treaties), all looseleafs, all multivolume sets, all reference material (including digests, directories, encyclopedias, and the like), all regularly updated (by pamphlet supplementation or pocket parts) material, and all non-paper formatted materials. Reserve materials may be used only within the library. However, reserve materials that would otherwise be circulating books may be checked out overnight if done within one hour of closing and returned within one hour of opening the next business day (except within the four weeks of final exams). Three-hour reserve materials circulate from the Library Service Desk for use within the library.

Books that circulate may be borrowed for four weeks. Four-week circulating books may be renewed by using the MyAccount feature in the Library's catalog, bringing the book to the Service Desk, or by telephone (312-906-5600). You may return books at the Service Desk or use the book drop near the Bursar's Office. If desired material is not on the shelf, circulation staff members may determine whether the book has been borrowed by someone, and if not, a search card will be filled out for the material. If requested, notification will be made when the material is found.

If desired material has been borrowed by someone, a hold may be placed on the material at the Service Desk. When the material is returned, it will be held at the Service Desk for three days. If material borrowed by another patron is urgently needed, a librarian may initiate a recall.

Interlibrary Transactions: Clients must pay any costs incurred when material is requested from another library.

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§ 17.4     Fine Schedule for Overdue Books

A fine schedule applies to overdue books. Fines on most overdue materials are $.50 per day with no maximum. Fines on Faculty Reserve materials kept over three hours are $.25 per hour.

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SECTION XVIII. CAREER SERVICES

§ 18.1     Use of Services

(a) Authorized Users

The Career Services Office, located in Suite 360, including all services and resources, is provided exclusively for the use of Chicago-Kent students and alumni. Students and graduates of other law schools will be allowed to use the office only when a reciprocity agreement is established between the law schools; services will be limited to those stated in Chicago-Kent's Reciprocity Policy found at: http://www.kentlaw.edu/depts/cso/reciprocitypolicy.pdf.

(b) Services to Visiting Students

During the term of their visitation, students from other law schools who are enrolled as visiting students at Chicago-Kent may use all services and resources of the Career Services Office. They must abide by the same office rules as Chicago-Kent students. Visiting students are limited to using the services of the Career Services Office during their term of visitation and are not entitled to use the office upon graduation unless a reciprocity agreement has been established.

Visiting students may participate in Chicago-Kent's fall on-campus interview program if they meet eligibility requirements, provide certification of their class rank status from the institution where they were enrolled prior to visitation and follow all fall on-campus interview program rules and procedures set forth for Chicago-Kent students. A visiting student who is participating in Chicago-Kent's interview program may not simultaneously participate in the interview program of the school from which they are visiting.

(c) Services to Chicago-Kent Students Visiting Other Institutions

A Chicago-Kent student enrolled as a visiting student at another institution shall use the career services office of that institution during the term of visitation. During the term of enrollment at another institution, a Chicago-Kent student is not eligible to participate in the fall on-campus interview program at Chicago-Kent, but may elect to participate in the fall on-campus program of the other institution if he/she is eligible. A Chicago-Kent student who plans to visit another institution should review the rules, policies and procedures of the career services office of the institution he/she plans to visit well in advance of the term of visitation.

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§ 18.2     Office Rules

(a) Job Postings and Resource Materials

Job postings for attorney and law clerk positions and the employment resource materials on file in the Career Services Office are for the use of all Chicago-Kent students and alumni. On-line job postings are password protected and passwords will not be provided to individuals not currently enrolled as a student or verified as an alumni by the university. Hard copy job postings and non-circulating resources located in the office may not be removed. Resources labeled for circulation are on file in the law school library and may be signed out in accordance with library policies. The fines imposed for overdue books are outlined at § 17.4 of the Handbook.

(b) Credential Statements

All information with respect to a candidate's academic record, school activities, employment history, or other biographical data provided by a candidate on a resume to prospective employers must be strictly accurate. It is the student's responsibility to obtain and report accurate information. It is not the responsibility of the Career Services Office to verify academic information before forwarding resumes to employers.

Grade point averages may not be rounded up. For example, a GPA of 2.967 may be listed only as 2.9, 2.96, or 2.967. When including a GPA on a resume the top of the grading scale must also be shown (i.e. 2.967/4.0). The method for calculating the GPA appears in §6.2 of the Handbook.

To report a class rank percentile as a whole number, the percentile must be rounded up at the one-half percentile mark. For example, a class rank which places a student in the 20.00% to 20.499% percentile range would be reported as top 20%; a class rank placing the student in the 20.50% to 21.00% percentile would be reported as top 21%. In the alternative, the actual class rank percentile may be used at any time without rounding up (i.e. Top 20.6% rather than rounding up to Top 21%).
Law Review students or members of the Moot Court Society must adhere to the following policies covering membership statements on resumes which each organization has adopted:

(1) A student who is newly admitted to or who has served less than two academic terms in either organization must qualify the membership statement on a resume with the phrase "as of (date of admittance)";

(2) A student must serve a minimum of two academic terms in either organization to retain a membership statement on his/her resume, and this membership statement must be qualified by the time period served;

(3) A student who serves less than two academic terms must remove any reference to membership in either organization from his/her resume.

(c) Missing or Canceling On-Campus Interviews

The only valid reason for canceling an on-campus interview is acceptance of a job offer. The only valid reason for missing an interview is an emergency situation. The Career Services Office must be notified immediately when either occurs so that another student can be scheduled into the available time slot. For the first missed interview, the Career Services Office will take away an additional interview. After the second missed interview, the student's remaining interviews for the academic term will be cancelled.

(d) Failure to Abide by the Rules and Procedures of the Career Services Office

Candidates utilizing the services of the Career Services Office are to adhere to the procedures and requirements established by the Office. Failure to do so will result in denial of services and may be a violation of the Code of Conduct. See §2-1(j) of the Code of Conduct in Section XIX of this Handbook.

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§ 18.3  Candidate Principles and Standards for Law Placement and Recruitment Activities

All Chicago-Kent students and alumni are strongly encouraged to abide by the Candidate Principles and Standards for Law Placement and Recruitment Activities as adopted by the National Association for Law Placement, of which Chicago-Kent is a member. Copies of this statement are available on-line at: http://www.nalp.org/principles/index.php?pid=16.

If participating in the Fall On-Campus Interviewing Program, students must adhere to Part V of the Principles and Standards, which addresses the "Standards for the Timing of Offers and Decisions." For details go to: http://www.nalp.org/principles/index.php?pid=16#part5
In any interviewing circumstance, students should promptly decline offers for employment which are no longer being seriously considered. Students are expected to accept only one offer of employment and should consider the acceptance of an offer a binding obligation. Upon acceptance of an offer of employment, students should immediately reject all other employment offers and withdraw from consideration with all other employers.

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§ 18.4     Employer Compliance with the Law School's Non-Discrimination Policy

It is Chicago-Kent's firm expectation that employers who use the facilities and services of the law school for interviewing and other recruitment functions will observe the principles of equal opportunity set forth in §§ 16.1 and 18.5 of this Handbook. The compliance requirements for employers using the various services of the Career Services Office are as follows:

(a) On-Campus Interviews at Chicago-Kent

All employers who use the law school's interviewing facilities will be required to sign a compliance form indicating adherence to the principles of equal opportunity, as stated in the law school's nondiscrimination policy. Employers who do not return the form in advance of the interview date and who refuse to sign the form the day of interviews will be barred from proceeding with interviews. If a compliance form has not been returned to the law school by the time students sign up for interview time slots, the students will be notified of the possibility that, on the day of interviews, the employer will be barred from interviewing.

An exception to the above compliance is granted to the United States Military Judge Advocate General Corps. Students having questions regarding this exception should see the Assistant Dean for Career Services.

(b) Joint Interviews in Conjunction with other Chicago Area Law Schools

All employers interviewing Chicago-Kent students jointly with students from other Chicago law schools will be required to sign a compliance form if they are interviewing on Chicago-Kent's campus.

(c) Consortium Interview Programs Co-Sponsored with other Law Schools or Organizations

The Career Services Office will communicate to the coordinator for each consortium the law school's expectation that the consortium will send to all employers invited to participate a non-discrimination policy which conforms with that of AALS and will require a signed compliance form from participating employers. If a consortium coordinator or sponsor or other participating schools decide not to follow this procedure, the law school will participate in the consortium. However, the Career Services Office will inform students of those consortia which use a nondiscrimination policy and require compliance and of those which do not.

(d) Job Posting System

The Career Services Office will notify employers of its non-discrimination policy in all job solicitation mailings and inform employers that by using the facilities and services of the law school career office, the employers affirm that their employment practices are consistent with this policy.

A notice in the job posting system will inform students that, in using the law school's career office facilities and services, employers affirm their intent to comply with the law school's principles of equal employment opportunity.

(e) Resource Materials

Public information that comes to the attention of the Career Services Office concerning discriminatory policies or practices of an employer will be included in Resource Center files along with informational materials provided by the employer.

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§18.5      Authorized Users Non-Discrimination Policy and Discrimination Complaint Procedures

(a) Non-Discrimination Policy
 
Chicago-Kent College of Law of the Illinois Institute of Technology provides its students, alumni, faculty members, law school administrators, and other authorized users of its placement facilities with equal opportunity to obtain employment without discrimination or segregation on the grounds of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, age, handicap or disability, sexual orientation, or gender identity. Facilities and services of the Chicago-Kent Career Services Office are available only to employers whose employment practices are consistent with this policy and are similarly non-discriminatory. This policy is enforceable through the procedures set forth in the next section.

(b) Complaint Procedures

    (1) Goals

The goals of the complaint procedures are conciliation and correction of abuses. The decision whether to file a complaint against an employer is up to the authorized user who wishes to file a complaint. The Director of Career Services ("Director") is available to consult with any authorized user who is uncertain whether to file a complaint. The Dean has sole discretion to designate someone else ("the Dean's designee") to fulfill the functions of the Director with regard to any of the complaint procedures.

    (2) Filing

Any current student, alumni, faculty member, law school administrator, or other authorized user of the Office of Career Services who believes that an employer has violated her/his rights under the authorized users non-discrimination placement policy may file with the Office of Career Services a written complaint against the employer. Any such complaint must be filed within 60 days after the complainant knew or should have known of such violation. Complaint forms are available in the Office of Career Services.

    (3) Confidentiality

Written complaints shall be kept in a confidential file in the Office of Career Services, and only the Director and the Dean shall have access to that file. If an Ad Hoc Placement Dispute Committee is formed pursuant to §18.5(c), it also may have access to that file. The identity of a complainant who has filed a complaint shall not be disclosed to any other person without the consent of the complainant.

    (4) Investigation

Investigation of complaints is the responsibility of the Director or the Dean's designee ("Investigator") . Upon receipt of a complaint, the Investigator shall investigate the complaint.

    (5) Remedial Measures and Conciliation

The Investigator shall attempt to resolve the matter in a way that is agreeable to the complainant, the employer, and the Chicago-Kent College of Law. If the Investigator determines that the matter cannot be so resolved, she/he shall so notify the complainant and the employer in writing. Whenever practicable, the notice should contain a brief account of the reasons for the Investigator's determination.

    (6) Further Action

If the complainant, the employer, or the Investigator is dissatisfied with the results of the complaint procedures, that person (or entity) may notify the Dean of her/his/its dissatisfaction. The Dean may then review the matter and may attempt to resolve the matter in a way that is agreeable to the complainant, the employer, and the Chicago-Kent College of Law.

(c) Further Proceedings
 
If the complaint cannot be resolved in a way that is agreeable to the complainant, the employer, or the Chicago-Kent College of Law, and if the Dean, the Investigator, and the complainant unanimously agree that further procedures should be instituted, the Dean shall appoint an Ad Hoc Placement Dispute Committee which shall further investigate the complaint and may conduct additional proceedings. The Committee may determine that Chicago-Kent's authorized users non-discrimination placement policy has been violated and impose sanctions. The composition and functions of the Committee, the procedures for conducting its proceedings, and the nature and extent of the sanctions which the Committee may impose shall be determined by regulations promulgated by the Dean.

(d) Monitoring of Complaints
 
At the end of each academic year, the Director shall prepare a report of all complaints received. The report will specify the types of issues raised in the complaints and the number of times each issue was raised; it will not identify the complainants or employers. Complaints will be kept on file in the Office of Career Services and monitored by the Director and the Dean. The Office of Career Services shall maintain the complete files created as a consequence of all complaints for not less than ten years. If a pattern of complaints against an employer emerges over a period of years, the Dean in her/his sole discretion may take further action, including but not limited to the filing of a complaint based on the conduct complained of.

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SECTION XIX. CODE OF CONDUCT

ARTICLE I. DEFINITIONS

§1-1    Alleged Violator: the student or former student suspected of having violated this Code who is named in the complaint or named by the Prosecutor pursuant to 5-4(d). Whenever the term appears, it also shall refer to the Alleged Violator's chosen representative.

§1-2    Associate Dean: the Associate Dean for the Faculty and Interprofessional Activities

§1-3    College: IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law.

§1-4    Complainant: the person who filed the complaint that alleges that a violation of this Code has occurred.

§1-5    Dean: The Dean of the College may designate any full-time voting faculty member or the Assistant Dean for Academic Administration and Student Affairs to perform the duties imposed upon the Dean by this Code, in which case "Dean" shall mean the designated individual. In any case in which the Dean is either an interested faculty member, a complainant, or an occurrence witness, the Associate Dean shall perform the duties imposed upon the Dean by this Code. If, in such a case, the Associate Dean is either an interested faculty member, a complainant, or an occurrence witness, the faculty members of the Academic Standards Committee shall elect a disinterested full-time voting member of the faculty to perform the duties imposed upon the Dean by this Code.

§1-6    Inform: When a provision of this Code requires that an individual "inform" another person, the communication may be made in person, by telephone, by letter or any other means.

§1-7    Interested faculty member or administrator: An interested faculty member is a faculty member in whose course the alleged violation of this Code occurred. In legal writing courses, both the section instructor and the Director of Legal Research are interested faculty members. With respect to alleged violations involving functions within the jurisdiction of an administrator, that administrator is an interested faculty member.

§1-8    Law School: Chicago-Kent College of Law.

§1-9    Notify: When a provision of this Code requires an individual to "notify" another person, such notification shall be by certified mail (however, return receipt need not be requested), registered e-mail, and in addition, may be by any other means.

§1-10    Presiding Officer: the Presiding Officer of the Tribunal.

§1-11    Publish: When a provision of this Code requires an individual to "publish" a notice or finding, such publication shall be either in the Record or on the official administration bulletin board or both, but shall not identify the names of the Alleged Violators.

§1-12    Tribunal: the Law School Discipline Tribunal.

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ARTICLE II. PROHIBITED CONDUCT

§2-1    Academic Misconduct

It shall be a violation of this Code for a matriculated or non-matriculated student, whether or not currently enrolled in the College, to engage in or attempt to engage in any of the following conduct, which, unless otherwise stated, must be done knowingly, recklessly, or negligently:

     (a) representing, expressly or impliedly, the work of another to be one's own;

     (b) giving, obtaining, or soliciting unauthorized assistance or using unauthorized material in the preparation of material to be submitted or presented in a class, law review assignment or competition, moot court assignment or competition, client counseling competition, essay contest which the student is able to enter by virtue of being a law student, or similar activity;

     (c) knowingly or recklessly hiding or stealing library material, or withdrawing such books or material from the library without properly charging them out, or defacing such books or material;

     (d) violating any rule imposed by the instructor or exam proctor;

     (e) identifying himself/herself by name or any other designation or symbol anywhere on the examination questions or answer booklet or disclosing his/her examination number to an instructor, either directly or indirectly, prior to the instructor having reported the grades for the course to the Registrar;

     (f) copying; or giving, receiving or soliciting unauthorized assistance or information during an exam;

     (g) using unauthorized material during an exam;

     (h) obtaining an exam, assignment, answer sheet or similar material in an unauthorized manner or at an unauthorized time;

     (i) writing after the exam time has expired;

     (j) making material misrepresentations in any submissions to or through the Admissions Office or the Career Services Office or to a potential employer; or

     (k) otherwise seeking to gain an unfair advantage over another student.

§2-2  Nonacademic Misconduct

It shall be a violation of this Code for a matriculated or non-matriculated student, whether or not currently enrolled in the College, to engage in or attempt to engage in any of the following conduct if it (a) affects or threatens to affect another IIT student or a member of the faculty, staff or administration of IIT; or (b) occurs on IIT premises or at a function sponsored by IIT or by an IIT student organization. Unless otherwise stated, such conduct must be done knowingly, recklessly or negligently.

     (a) Engaging in dishonest conduct, including cheating, plagiarizing, or knowingly furnishing false information to the university;

     (b) Forging, altering, or using university documents, records, or instruments of identification with intent to defraud;

     (c) Harassing and/or hazing in all forms, which includes, but is not limited to, striking, laying hands upon, threatening with violence, or offering to do bodily harm to another person, or other treatment of a demeaning, abusive, taunting, or alarming nature;

     (d) Intentionally obstructing or disrupting teaching, research, administration, disciplinary proceedings, or other university activities and other authorized activities on IIT's premises;

     (e) Physically abusing any person or engaging in conduct that threatens or endangers the health or safety of any such person;

     (f) Selling, distributing, manufacturing, using, or possessing illegal drugs;

     (g) Possessing or using firearms, fireworks, explosives, or weapons of any description, for any purpose;

     (h) Stealing from or damaging university premises, or property of a member of the IIT community on the university premises;

     (i) Failing to comply with directions of university officials or engaging in disorderly or abusive conduct toward university officials acting in performance of their duties;

     (j) Violating published university regulations, including regulations relating to entry and use of IIT facilities and alleged copyright infringement under the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA);

     (k) Violating federal, state, or municipal laws on university premises (or in university residence halls) in a way that adversely affects the functioning of the university;

     (l) Making false statements to, presenting false evidence to, or failing to comply with a subpoena issued by the Tribunal or otherwise obstructing the administration of this Code.

     (m) Sexual misconduct, which includes:

(i) Sexual assault, which is defined as any of the following conduct if done without effective consent: (a) sexual intercourse (anal, oral, or vaginal); (b) physical sexual violence, such as sexual assault or sexual battery; and (c) sexual touching of another, however slight, including sexual touching with an object; and (d) disrobing of another;

(ii) Dating violence, which is defined as violence committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim, where the existence of such a relationship is determined based upon a consideration of the length of the relationship, the type of relationship, and the frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the relationship;

(iii) Domestic violence, which includes felony or misdemeanor crimes of violence committed by a current or former spouse of the victim, by a person with whom the victim shares a child in common, by a person who is cohabitating with or has cohabitated with the victim as a spouse, by a person similarly situated to a spouse of the victim under the domestic or family violence laws of the State of Illinois, or by any other person against an adult or youth victim who is protected from that person’s acts under the domestic or family violence laws of the State of Illinois;

(iv) Sexual exploitation, which is defined as taking non-consensual or abusive sexual advantage of another for one’s own benefit or to the benefit of another other than the person being exploited and that does not otherwise meet the definition of sexual misconduct, such as, but not limited to, prostituting another, non-consensual video or audio taping of sexual activity, engaging in voyeurism, invading another’s sexual privacy, and exposing one’s genitals or inducing another to expose his or her genitals in non-consensual circumstances;

(v) Stalking, which is defined as a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to fear for his or her safety or the safety of others or to suffer substantial emotional distress. 

For purposes of the foregoing relevant offenses, effective consent is informed, freely and actively given, mutually understandable words or actions which indicate a positive agreement to participate in mutually agreed upon sexual activity. Consent must be clear and unambiguous, and it should not be presumed in the absence of such an agreement.  The absence of “no” should not be understood to per se mean there is consent. Consent is not effective if it results from the use of force, threats, intimidation, or coercion.  In addition, to have sex with someone whom the person knows, or should know, to be, incapable of making a rational, reasonable decision about a sexual situation is a violation of this policy (e.g. an intoxicated person or someone with a mental or emotional impairment).

The College abides by the IIT Policy and Procedures Applicable to Sexual Harassment and Sexual Misconduct, which is incorporated herein by reference. Any action brought against a student of the College alleging sexual misconduct shall be conducted in accordance with the procedures specified in this Code of Conduct, as well as any additional procedures contained in the IIT Policy to the extent that they are not inconsistent with provisions of this Code.

§2-3    Felony Conviction

Any felony conviction that occurs prior to a student's first admission to the College, if not disclosed on the student's application, or after the student's first admission to the College and prior to the student's graduation from the College shall be a per-se violation of this Code. Upon notification of such a conviction, the Tribunal shall proceed in accordance with §6-4 to determine the appropriate sanction; provided, however, that in the event of an appeal of the felony conviction, the Tribunal may suspend the Alleged Violator from the College pending final determination of the appeal.

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ARTICLE III. LAW SCHOOL DISCIPLINE TRIBUNAL

§3-1    The Law School Discipline Tribunal shall have jurisdiction over all alleged violations of this Code.

§3-2    The Tribunal shall have jurisdiction whether or not the Alleged Violator is currently enrolled in the College. The Tribunal may proceed in the absence of the Alleged Violator who, after due notice, fails to be present or to participate in the proceedings. A finding that the Alleged Violator is guilty of a violation of this Code shall not be based solely on the absence of the Alleged Violator.

§3-3    There shall be two Tribunals convened each year; the Dean shall have the discretion to assign a case to either of the Tribunals. Each Law School Discipline Tribunal shall consist of three members: two faculty and one student. The Dean shall appoint one member of each Tribunal as its Presiding Officer.

§3-4

     (a) The faculty members of the Tribunal shall be appointed by the Dean for two-year terms which shall commence on May 1. The terms of the faculty members of each panel shall be staggered. During the first year of this Code, the Dean shall appoint one faculty member to each Tribunal with a one-year term and one faculty member with a two-year term. Once a Charge has been submitted to a Tribunal pursuant to §5-6, the members of that Tribunal shall have jurisdiction over the Charge until its final disposition, notwithstanding the termination of a Tribunal member's term of office.

     (b) Only full-time voting members of the faculty may serve on a Tribunal. The Dean and the Associate Dean shall not be eligible to serve on a Tribunal.

     (c) If a faculty member of a Tribunal is an interested faculty member, an occurrence witness, or the complainant in a particular case, or if he/she recuses himself/herself, the Dean shall appoint a replacement for him or her for purposes of that case only.

     (d) If a faculty vacancy occurs on a Tribunal, the Dean shall appoint a replacement to serve out the unexpired term.

§3-5

     (a) The student member of each Tribunal shall be appointed by the Dean from a panel of students selected by the Student Bar Association. The student member shall be appointed for a one-year term which shall commence on May 1.

     (b) If the student member of a Tribunal is the complainant, an occurrence witness, or the Alleged Violator in a particular case, or if he/she recuses himself/herself, the Dean shall appoint a replacement for purposes of that case only.

     (c) If a complaint alleging a violation of this Code is filed against a student member of a Tribunal, he/she may continue to sit on the Tribunal while the complaint is investigated. Upon a finding of probable cause by the Prosecutor, the student shall be disqualified from sitting on the Tribunal pending resolution of the case. Upon conviction, the student member shall be removed from the Tribunal.

     (d) If a student vacancy occurs on a Tribunal, the Dean shall appoint a replacement to serve out the unexpired term.

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ARTICLE IV. GUILTY PLEA

§4-1    An Alleged Violator may at any time admit to the Tribunal his/her violation of this Code. The Tribunal may find the Alleged Violator guilty and proceed in accordance with §6-4. A student may not plead nolo contendere.

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ARTICLE V. PREHEARING PROCEDURES

§5-1    Any person (including a faculty member or administrator) who has a reasonable basis for believing a violation has occurred has an obligation to file a complaint with the Dean. The complaint shall be in writing, signed by the complainant, and shall contain a statement of facts upon which the complaint is based. Any proceeding under this Code shall provide a prompt, fair, and impartial investigation and resolution of the allegations in a complaint.

§5-2    There shall be no period of limitation for filing complaints, but prejudice resulting from excessive delay may be a defense as set forth in §5-9.

§5-3

     (a) Upon receiving a complaint, the Dean shall appoint a Prosecutor as expeditiously as possible, who shall represent the interest of the law school in the matter. If, during the course of an investigation, the Prosecutor is unable to act, the Dean shall appoint a replacement.

     (b) The Prosecutor shall be a full-time voting member of the faculty. The Dean and the Associate Dean shall not be eligible to serve as the Prosecutor.

     (c) A faculty member shall not be eligible to serve as the Prosecutor in a case in which he/she is the complainant, an occurrence witness, or an interested faculty member, or if he/she is a member of the Tribunal.

§5-4    Within 10 days after being appointed, the Prosecutor shall:

     (a) Inform any interested faculty member or administrator and notify the Alleged Violator of the fact that a complaint has been filed and of the nature of the alleged violation. The written notification to the Alleged Violator shall advise him/her of the following: (1) the right to select any person other than a member of the faculty of the College to represent him/her at his/her cost (§5-8); and (2) the fact that he/she has no obligation to speak to the Prosecutor nor to testify at any hearing before the Tribunal (§6-3(b)).

     (b) Publish a notice informing the student body that a violation has been alleged and stating the course or context in which the violation allegedly occurred, the nature of the alleged violation, and the name of the Prosecutor. This notice shall remain posted until the Prosecutor publishes the probable cause finding.

     (c) Begin an investigation which shall be completed within 30 days of its commencement, if practicable.

     (d) The Prosecutor is not limited to the allegation(s) or the Alleged Violator(s) specified in the complaint. As soon as the investigation focuses on an individual not named in the complaint as one who may have violated this Code in the same transaction as the Alleged Violator, the Prosecutor shall comply with the notice provisions of §5-4(a) and (b). If the Prosecutor discovers a reason to believe that an individual not named in the complaint may have violated this Code in a transaction not related to the one complained of, the Prosecutor shall file a complaint with the Dean pursuant to §5-1.

§5-5

     (a) If, after completing the investigation of the complaint, the Prosecutor determines that there exists no probable cause to believe that the conduct alleged to be a violation of this Code has occurred, he/she shall not proceed with the prosecution and shall comply with the notification procedures in §5-5(d). No appeal shall be allowed from this determination.

     (b) If, after completing the investigation of the complaint, the Prosecutor determines that the conduct alleged does not, as a matter of law, violate this Code, he/she shall not proceed with the prosecution and shall comply with the notification procedures in §5-5(d). Such a determination may be appealed to the faculty by the complainant or any interested faculty member or administrator. The appeal shall follow the procedures set forth in §5-9(c) and (d).

     (c) If at any time prior to a formal finding of probable cause, the Prosecutor determines that any violation that may have occurred is de minimis, or that the prosecution of any violation that may have occurred would not be in the best interests of the law school, the Prosecutor shall have discretion not to proceed with the prosecution. If the Prosecutor decides not to proceed with the prosecution, he/she shall comply with the notification procedures set forth in §5-5(d). The Prosecutor shall have discretion to condition the decision not to prosecute on the student's acceptance of a private or public reprimand. The Prosecutor's decisions may be appealed to the Dean by the complainant or any interested faculty member or administrator by filing a notice of appeal with the Dean within one week of being notified of the Prosecutor's decision.

     (d) If the Prosecutor determines that he/she shall not proceed with the prosecution pursuant to §5-5 (a), (b) or (c), no notation shall appear on the student's transcript. The Prosecutor shall, as soon as practicable, notify the Alleged Violator and inform the complainant and any interested faculty member or administrator of this determination, including the reasons for the determination. The Prosecutor shall publish a notice stating that the complaint has been investigated and that the Prosecutor has determined that further proceedings in the matter are not warranted. The published notice shall be dated and shall remain posted for one week while regular classes are in session.

     (e) In an instance where the faculty or the Dean has reversed a Prosecutor's decision not to prosecute under this section, the Dean shall appoint a new Prosecutor.

§5-6    If, after completing the investigation of the complaint, the Prosecutor finds that there exists probable cause to believe that a violation of this Code has occurred, or if a new Prosecutor has been appointed pursuant to §5-5(e), the Prosecutor shall:

     (a) prepare a Charge for each Alleged Violator setting forth the alleged violations of this Code;

     (b) publish a notice informing the student body that the Prosecutor has found probable cause that a violation of this Code has occurred and describing the violation(s) set forth in the Charge. The published notice shall be dated and shall remain posted for one week while regular classes are in session;

     (c) notify each Alleged Violator of the finding of probable cause and provide a copy of the Charge against him/her;

     (d) inform the complainant and any interested faculty member or administrator of this finding and provide them with a copy of the Charge;

     (e) submit the Charge to the Presiding Officer of the Tribunal designated by the Dean; and

     (f) prosecute the case before the Tribunal.

§5-7    Upon receiving the Charge, the Presiding Officer shall set a violation hearing on the Charge to begin no earlier than 10 days and no later than 30 days from the receipt of the Charge. The Presiding Officer shall notify the Alleged Violator and inform the Prosecutor, the complainant, and any interested faculty member or administrator of the date of the hearing and the identity of the members of the Tribunal. The hearing shall be concluded as expeditiously as practicable.

§5-8    The Alleged Violator may select any person other than a member of the faculty of the College to represent him/her. The Alleged Violator shall bear the costs of his/her representation.

§5-9

     (a) The Alleged Violator may file a motion to dismiss the Prosecutor's Charge on the ground that it fails to state a violation of this Code or on the ground that excessive delay in filing the complaint has prejudiced the defense. Such motion shall be filled with the Presiding Officer within one week prior to the date scheduled for the violation hearing.

     (b) The Tribunal shall rule on the motion no later than 24 hours before the date scheduled for the violation hearing. If the motion is denied, the hearing shall proceed as scheduled.

     (c) If the motion is granted, the Tribunal shall notify the Alleged Violator, publish its decision and inform the Prosecutor, complainant, and any interested faculty member or administrator. The Prosecutor, complainant, interested faculty member or administrator may appeal the decision to the faculty by filing a notice of appeal with the Dean within one week of the notification of the Tribunal's decision. The Dean shall place the appeal on the agenda of the next regularly scheduled faculty meeting. If the notice of appeal is filed with the Dean after the last regularly scheduled faculty meeting of the academic year, the Dean may call a special meeting of the faculty for the purpose of hearing the appeal. The appellant may file a brief no later than one week before the faculty meeting. The appellee may file a brief no later than three days before the faculty meeting. If the date of the next regularly scheduled faculty meeting is within 7 days after the notice of appeal is filed, upon the request of either party, the appeal shall be postponed to the meeting following the next regularly scheduled faculty meeting.

     (d) The appeal shall be considered by all full-time voting faculty members in attendance at the faculty meeting, except the Prosecutor, interested faculty member, and complainant (if a faculty member). There shall be no oral argument. The Dean shall publish the faculty's ruling and notify the Alleged Violator and inform the Prosecutor, complainant, and any interested faculty member or administrator of the ruling.

§5-10

     (a) The members of the Tribunal shall be subject to challenge for cause by either the Alleged Violator or the Prosecutor.

     (b) A motion challenging a member for cause shall be filed with the Dean no later than one week prior to the date scheduled for the hearing on the complaint.

     (c) If the Dean concludes that the challenged member of the Tribunal is disqualified for cause, or if a member of the Tribunal recuses himself/herself, the Dean shall appoint a replacement for the purpose of that case only.

§5-11

     (a) The Prosecutor shall provide the Alleged Violator and the Presiding Officer with a list of witnesses and copies of all relevant documents. An initial list of witnesses and copies of documents shall be provided at the time the Prosecutor notifies the Alleged Violator of the probable cause finding. The list shall be updated and copies of additional documents shall be provided as soon as additional witnesses or documents become known to the Prosecutor.

     (b) The Alleged Violator shall provide the Prosecutor and the Presiding Officer with a list and copies of documents, and a statement of the defense no later than one week prior to the scheduled hearing date. The list shall be updated and copies of additional documents shall be provided as soon as additional witnesses or documents become known to the Alleged Violator.

     (c) he above subsections shall not apply to witnesses called in rebuttal or surrebuttal.

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ARTICLE VI. HEARING PROCEDURES

§6-1    The proceedings and deliberations of the Tribunal shall not be open to the public, the student body, or the faculty at large. Any alleged victim has the same right to have others present during Tribunal hearings as the Alleged Violator, including the opportunity to be accompanied by an advisor of his/her choice. This includes alleged victims in proceedings brought under §2-2(c) (harassing and/or hazing), §2-2(e) (physically abusing another or engaging in conduct that threatens or endangers another), and §2-2(m) (sexual misconduct).

§6-2    A court reporter shall be in attendance at all hearings of the Tribunal.

§6-3    The violation hearing before the Tribunal shall be governed by the following rules of procedure:

     (a) Both the Prosecutor and the Alleged Violator shall be given the opportunity to make a brief opening statement; the Alleged Violator may reserve the opening statement until the conclusion of the Prosecutor's case-in-chief.

     (b) Witnesses, including the Alleged Violator, may be called and evidentiary matter offered by the Prosecutor, the Alleged Violator, and the Tribunal. However the Alleged Violator has no obligation to testify.

     (c) The Tribunal shall have the right to call and to question any witnesses.

     (d) The Presiding Officer shall issue a subpoena to appear and/or to produce documents upon the request of the Prosecutor, the Alleged Violator, or upon the motion of any member of the Tribunal. Subpoenaed witnesses may move to quash the subpoena for cause.

     (e) Upon request of either the Prosecutor or the Alleged Violator, or upon its own motion, the Tribunal may provide for exclusion of witnesses.

     (f) The Prosecutor and the Alleged Violator may challenge the admissibility of evidence for any reason. Evidentiary rulings shall be made by the Presiding Officer and his/her rulings shall govern unless overruled by a majority of the Tribunal. The Tribunal shall exercise discretion in admitting evidence and need not be bound by the formal rules of evidence.

     (g) The Prosecutor and the Alleged Violator each shall have the right to cross-examine witnesses called by the other.

     (h) The Prosecutor and the Alleged Violator each shall have the right to make closing arguments.

     (i) The burden of proof shall be on the Prosecutor to prove by clear and convincing evidence that the Alleged Violator committed a violation of this Code.

     (j) Whenever reasonably possible, the Tribunal shall begin deliberations immediately following the close of the hearing. The decision shall be made solely upon the evidence presented. A finding of "guilty" must be concurred in by at least two members of the Tribunal. The Tribunal shall issue written findings of fact and conclusions of "guilty" or "not guilty" as soon as practicable. Concurring and dissenting opinions may also be issued. The Presiding Officer shall notify the Alleged Violator and inform the Prosecutor, the complainant and any interested faculty member or administrator of the findings and opinions. If the Tribunal finds the Alleged Violator "not guilty," the Tribunal shall publish its finding. The published notice shall be dated and shall remain posted for one week while regular classes are in session.

§6-4    If the Tribunal finds the Alleged Violator "guilty," the Presiding Officer shall set a penalty hearing to occur no later than one week after the issuance of the written findings. The Presiding Officer shall notify the Alleged Violator, the Prosecutor, the complainant and any interested faculty member or administrator of the date of the hearing. At the hearing, the Prosecutor may present evidence in aggravation and the Convicted Violator may present evidence in mitigation. The complainant, the prosecutor, any interested faculty member or administrator and the Convicted Violator shall be given the opportunity to address the Tribunal.

§6-5

     (a) The Tribunal, by a majority vote, may impose any one or more of the following sanctions:

        (1)    expulsion from the College;

        (2)    suspension from the College for a specified period of time;

        (3)    a grade "E" in the course in which the violation occurred;

        (4)    loss of credit for the course in which the violation occurred;

        (5)    a grade of Incomplete in the course in which the violation occurred;

        (6)    cancellation of the work done; or

        (7)    any other sanction, or any variation of the above sanctions, deemed appropriate by the Tribunal.

     (b) Whenever a student is convicted of violating this Code, a notation to that effect shall be made on the individual's transcript. However, if the Tribunal unanimously determines that the interests of justice so require, the Tribunal may suspend the entry of said notation on conditions it deems appropriate. Whether or not the violation is noted on the transcript, it will be reported to appropriate licensing authorities.

§6-6    Following imposition of sanctions, the Tribunal shall notify the Convicted Violator, inform the Prosecutor and publish findings of fact and conclusions of law and the sanctions imposed, provided however that if the full opinion in the case exceeds five pages in length, the Tribunal shall publish only a summary thereof, not to exceed five pages, which will include a statement that the full opinion is on file with the Associate Dean. The published notice shall be dated and shall remain posted for one week while regular classes are in session.

§6-7    In cases involving an alleged victim, the Tribunal, at the same time that it notifies the Alleged Violator or Convicted Violator of any Tribunal finding or action, shall notify the alleged victim in writing of such finding or action; the procedures applicable to any appeal of such finding or action; any change to the results of the proceeding due to any appeal; and when the results have become final. This includes alleged victims in proceedings brought under §2-2(c) (harassing and/or hazing), §2-2(e) (physically abusing another or engaging in conduct that threatens or endangers another), and §2-2(m) (sexual misconduct).

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ARTICLE VII. APPEAL

§7-1

     (a) The Convicted Violator shall have the right to appeal the conviction to the faculty. All matters are appealable by the Convicted Violator except findings of fact. Notice of such appeal must be filed with the Dean not later than ten days after the notification of sanctions has been mailed.

     (b) The Prosecutor may appeal the sanctions imposed on the Convicted Violator by filing a notice of appeal with the Dean not later than ten days after notification of sanctions has been mailed.

§7-2

     (a) Upon filing a notice of appeal under §7-1, the appellant shall have 21 days within which to file a written brief with the Dean. The appellee shall have 14 days to file a response.

     (b) Upon receipt of timely filed briefs, the Dean shall place the appeal on the agenda for the next regularly scheduled faculty meeting. If the briefs are received after the last regular faculty meeting of the academic year, the Dean may call a special meeting of the faculty for the purpose of hearing the appeal.

§7-3

     (a) When an appeal is being considered, only full-time members of the faculty shall be present.

     (b) Upon written request to the Dean no later than one week before the faculty meeting, the parties shall be afforded an opportunity for oral argument to the faculty. If the date of the faculty meeting makes the one week time period impossible to comply with, the request for oral argument shall be made as soon as possible.

     (c) The members of the Tribunal, the Prosecutor, and all other faculty members otherwise involved in the proceeding before the Tribunal except those whose involvement was limited to being a character witness, shall be disqualified from sitting on the appeal. Such faculty members may be present during oral argument but shall absent themselves immediately thereafter.

§7-4    When the faculty has decided an appeal, the Dean shall notify the convicted student and inform the interested faculty member or administrator of the faculty's decision, and shall publish the result of the appeal.

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ARTICLE VIII. MAINTENANCE OF RECORDS

§8-1    The Dean shall preserve and retain the records, including the complaint, the Charge and the record of proceedings before the Tribunal, in all cases. They shall be kept in a separate and confidential file. The records of any Alleged Violator not convicted of a violation shall not be released without the consent of the Alleged Violator.

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ARTICLE IX. EXCLUSIVITY OF THIS CODE

§9-1    A faculty member shall not decrease a student's grade because of an alleged violation of this Code if the student has been found not guilty by the Tribunal, or if the Charge against the student has been dismissed for failure to state an offense, and either that dismissal has been affirmed on appeal by the faculty or the time for filing an appeal has expired and no appeal has been filed.

§9-2    If the alleged violation occurred in a course, the instructor may not report a grade to the Registrar until the Code of Conduct proceedings are concluded. If the grade has already been reported to the Registrar, the Registrar shall not record the grade until the proceedings are concluded. If the Tribunal lowers a violator's grade as one of the sanctions, the Registrar must record the grade determined by the Tribunal.

§9-3

     (a) There shall be no plea bargaining between an interested faculty member or administrator and a student or a former student whom the faculty member or administrator believes violated this Code.

     (b) There may be plea bargaining between an Alleged Violator and the Prosecutor, in consultation with the Assistant Dean for Academic Administration and Student Affairs. A plea bargaining agreement will be sent  to the complainant and any interested faculty member or administrator. The complainant or any interested faculty member or administrator may appeal the agreement to the Dean by filing  a notice of appeal with the Dean within one week of being notified of the plea bargaining agreement.

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ARTICLE X. EFFECTIVE DATE; REPEAL; SAVINGS; AMENDMENTS

§10-1    This Code became effective on May 30, 1989, and applies to all conduct occurring on or after that date.

§10-2    The Ethics Code previously in effect was on May 30, 1989.

§10-3    Notwithstanding the repeal provided for in §10-2:

     (a) any violation of the provisions of the Ethics Code committed before May 30, 1989, was prosecuted and punished in accordance with the provisions of the Ethics Code previously in effect.

     (b) any proceedings under the former Ethics Code pending on the effective date of this Code of Conduct was conducted in accordance with the provisions of that Ethics Code.

§10-4    Upon approval by the faculty, copies of this Code shall be distributed to the student body in the same manner as the Record is distributed. This Code shall be published in the next edition of the Student Handbook and in each subsequent edition.

§10-5

     (a) This Code may be amended upon the affirmative vote of a majority of the faculty. The amendment shall apply to all conduct occurring after the date of the amendment.

     (b) Prior to a vote by the faculty to amend this Code, the proposed amendment shall be distributed to the student body in the same manner as the Record is distributed, with adequate time for student comment.

     (c) Upon faculty approval of an amendment, copies of the amendment shall be distributed to the student body in the same manner as the Record is distributed. The Code, as amended, shall be published in the next edition of the Student Handbook and in each subsequent edition.

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SECTION XX. DRUG AND ALCOHOL ABUSE PREVENTION

Illinois Institute of Technology is committed to the principle of preventing the use of illicit drugs and abuse of alcohol by members of the university community. In accordance with this commitment and in compliance with the Drug Free Schools and Campus Act of 1989, this policy affirms the university's goal to maintain an environment that is free of illegal usage of drugs and alcohol. All students and employees are expected to comply with the policy. The drug and alcohol abuse prevention policy is available from Jamie Lake, the Director of Student Services (Room 310F; 312/906-5247; jlake@kentlaw.edu).

Counseling

IIT has a comprehensive drug free awareness program to inform employees and students about the dangers of drug and alcohol use and assist them in obtaining counseling and treatment which includes full availability of the Counseling Center to all students for counseling and/or referral for treatment. In addition, the Lawyers Assistance Program ("LAP") can provide confidential counseling regarding substance abuse problems. LAP is a non-for-profit organization which offers aid and assistance to Illinois lawyers, judges, and law students with emotional and chemical dependency problems. LAP's primary services include information and referral, peer assistance, intervention, in the case of chemical dependency, and education. For counseling information or referral, see Jamie Lake, the Director of Student Services (Room 310F; 312/906-5247; jlake@kentlaw.edu).

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