List of Recommended Courses for Upper-Level Students
(adopted by the faculty February 1998)

Courses with an asterisk (*) cover material that is likely to be tested on many states' bar examinations, including that of Illinois. Other subject areas may also be tested; you should review the Illinois Bar Exam Information Statement in the Registration Bulletin -- or, if you plan to take another state's bar examination, contact the bar examiners in that state -- before deciding which of these and other courses to take.

I.  The faculty believes that every student should take:

A.    *Business Organizations (4 hours)
B.    *Evidence (3 hours)
C.     Personal Income Tax (3 hours)
D.     *Remedies (3 hours)
II.  The faculty believes that every student should take at least 15 hours from the following list of courses, with most courses taken from subsection A and at least one course taken from subsection B. Courses not included in this list should not be thought of as less challenging or unimportant. They may have been left off because they cover advanced or very specialized material, or because they focus on non-traditional legal materials. Students may take some of those courses with their remaining electives.

For those students whose grade point average is in the lower third of the class after they complete their first year of law school (two semesters for day students and three semesters for evening students), we recommend in the strongest terms possible that they take at least 20 hours (rather than 15) from the following list, with a heavy emphasis on courses that cover subject matter that may be tested on the Bar Exam.

A.    Courses in major areas of law:
1.    Administrative Law (3 hours).
2.    Civil Litigation: one of the following: Appellate Courts (3 hours), Civil Procedure 2 (3 hours),
       Complex Litigation (3 hours), Federal Courts (3 hours), *Illinois Civil Procedure (2 hours).
3.    Commercial Law: one or two of the following: *Sales (2 hours), *Secured Transactions
       (3 hours), *Payment Systems (3 hours), *Survey (4 hours).
4.    *Conflict of Laws (3 hours)
5.    *Constitutional Law: First Amendment (3 hours).
6.    Criminal Procedure: *The Adjudicative Process (3 hours), or *The Investigative Process
       (3 hours).
7.    *Estates and Trusts (4 hours).
8.    *Family Law (3 hours).
9.    International Law (3 hours) or Comparative Law (3 hours).
10.  *Products Liability (2 hours).
B.    Courses focusing on statutory analysis and/or administrative agencies:
1.    Antitrust (3 hours).
2.    Bankruptcy (3 hours).
3.    Copyright Law (3 hours) or Patent Law (3 hours).
4.    Employee Benefits Law (2 or 3 hours).
5.    Employment Discrimination (3 hours).
6.    Environmental Law and Policy (3 hours).
7.    Labor Law (4 hours).
8.    Legislation (3 hours).
9.    Securities Regulation (3 hours).
10.  Taxation of Business Enterprises (4 hours).
III.  The faculty believes that every student should take at least one skills or one clinical course from the following list of such courses. Beginning in February 1998, the Illinois Bar Examination began using the Multistate Performance Test to test six fundamental lawyering skills: problem, solving, legal analysis and reasoning, factual analysis, communication, organization and management of a legal task, and recognizing and resolving ethical dilemmas. Each of the courses listed below teaches some of the above-listed skills. You should review the Illinois Bar Exam Information Statement in the registration materials - or, if you plan to take another state's bar examination, contact the bar examiners in that state - before deciding which of these courses to take.
A. Skills courses:
1.    Business Entity Formation (3 hours).
2.    Business Entity Transactions (3 hours).
3.    Employment Litigation (3 hours) (for students in the Labor and Employment Law Certificate
       Program only).
4.    Pretrial Litigation (3 hours) (for students in the LADR Program only).
5.    Trial Advocacy (3 hours).
B. Clinical courses:
1.    In-House Clinic (3 or 4 hours):
a. Civil Litigation (3 or 4 hours).
b. Criminal Defense (3 or 4 hours).
c. Health Law Litigation (3 hours).
d. Mediation and ADR (3 or 4 hours).
e. Tax Litigation (3 hours).
2.    Judicial Externship (4 hours).
3.    Advanced Externship (4 hours).
4.    Labor and Employment Externship (4 hours) (for students in the Labor and Employment Law
       Certificate Program only).
revised 11/9/98